What to do in Worthington State Forest

Information provided by New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry

A rocky and sometimes steep trail follows Dunnfield Creek from the Delaware River to Mount Tammany or hikers may choose to follow the trail to Sunfish Pond, one of the most popular sites in the area. Millions of years in the making, the pond was carved out by glacial forces during the last ice age and is one of fourteen rock-basin lakes between the Delaware Water Gap and the end of Kittatinny Ridge. A trail circles the pond, with many boulders and openings for resting and observation.

Interpretive Programs

Interpretive programs are offered seasonally from April to October in the campground. Programs are also offered year round for schools and organized groups.

Recreation
Trails

There are over 26 miles of trails within the park including 5 miles of canoe trails on the Delaware River and over 7 miles of the Appalachian Trail. All trails within the park are hiking only. A demanding climb to the top of Mt. Tammany at 1527 ft. above sea level rewards the park visitor with a panoramic view of the Delaware Water Gap. A new interpretive trail, the Rockcores Trail, has been developed and offers some natural and historic information to the park visitor.

Appalachian Trail - The Appalachian Trail passes through Worthington to Stokes State Forest and High Point State Park. One of the earliest roads in the region - the Old Mine Road - skirts the forest along the Delaware River. The road was used for transporting copper and slate from the mines and quarries in the area, and is believed to have originally been a well-defined Indian trail. The trail was also used by fur traders and Dutch settlers.

Dunnfield Creek Natural Area (1,085 acres) - Hikers, fishermen, bird watchers and other naturalists can follow this moderate trail through a mature hemlock and mixed hardwood ravine along Dunnfield Creek. This area is designated a Wild Trout Stream and supports a healthy population of native brook trout, the state fish of New Jersey.

Sunfish Pond Natural Area (258 acres) - This impressive glacial lake, surrounded by a chestnut oak forest is reached by a steep and rocky climb along the Appalachian Trail. No swimming or camping is permitted at this area, however, 1/4 mile south of the pond along the Appalachian Trail is a backpacking wilderness camping area. This camping area is monitored by a caretaker who teaches Leave No Trace techniques, precautions on Living in Bear Country and enforces the No Fire regulation.

Camping - Campsites: 69 tent and trailer sites with picnic tables and fire rings. Open April 1 through December 31. Campsites 1-77 have modern toilets and showers.

Group campsites: Three group sites; capacity: 35 each. Picnic tables, fire rings, modern toilets.

Hunting - Abundant populations of deer, turkey and small game offer many hunting opportunities for the public. Hunting is subject to New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife regulations.

Picnicking - A small family picnic area has been added to the area and offers a peaceful, picturesque setting under a hemlock grove near the Delaware River. Limited space is available.

Location
Warren County,Old Mine RoadDelaware Water Gap

Take Route 80 west to the last exit in New Jersey (Millbrook/Flatbrookville). At bottom of ramp, turn right. Office is three miles on left.

Climate
The temperatures in New Jersey vary slightly, with the southern area being the warmest. Winter weather can start by October and is in full force by November, temperatures average 20 to 40 degrees. Spring can begin in mid March and brings temperatures of 50 degrees F, by April temperatures can reach 65 degrees F. Summer weather can extend from late May to mid September, and temperatures often reach 95 degrees during this season with nighttime lows near 65 degrees. Fall weather has temperatures between 65 and 45 degrees F. Precipitation levels in New Jersey are highest from March through August.

Address
HC 62, Box 2
Columbia, NJ 07832

Phone: 908-841-9575

Email: Michele.buckley@dep.state.nj.us
  • Worthington State Forest Travel Q&A

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