What to do in Werner-Boyce Salt Springs State Park

**Note: This information was provided by www.floridastateparks.org.

This park protects four miles of pristine coastline along the Gulf of Mexico in western Pasco County. The salt spring looks small, but it is an amazing 320 feet deep. Gray fox, gopher tortoises, alligators, and West Indian manatees call this park and its waters home. Birdwatchers can enjoy sighting raptors, wading birds, shore birds, and migratory songbirds. A recent addition to the state park system, Werner-Boyce now has a picnic pavilion, tables, informational kiosk, and a short hiking trail. Plans for the future include providing more access and recreational opportunities for visitors.

Visitors can boat into the park from the west, but must launch their boats from somewhere else. The park does not have a boat launch/ramp or docks.

Inshore saltwater fishing can yield catches of flounder, snook, trout, redfish, snapper, whiting, sheepshead and tarpon.

A small trailhead with ½ mile of trail. In the future we will add more hiking trails, primative camping, group camping, picnicing and marked canoe/kayak trails with a launch.

Recreation
Visitors can boat into the park from the west, but must launch their boats from somewhere else. The park does not have a boat launch/ramp or docks.

Inshore saltwater fishing can yield catches of flounder, snook, trout, redfish, snapper, whiting, sheepshead and tarpon.

A small trailhead with ½ mile of trail. In the future we will add more hiking trails, primative camping, group camping, picnicing and marked canoe/kayak trails with a launch.

Location
Located off Scenic Drive in Port Richey. Turn west off U.S. 19 at Regency Park Boulevard, go one mile to the intersection of Scenic Drive and Cinema Drive.

Climate
Florida's weather is dominated by the water that surrounds it. The Atlantic Ocean in the east and the Gulf of Mexico in the west provide a stabilizing force that maintains the mild climate. Northern Florida is considered sub tropical, although it does receive some snow. This area is drier than the rest of the state. Southern areas of the state, definitely the Keys, lie within a tropical climate. Humidity is high, a characteristic of the climate, although the temperatures usually don't extend past 90 degrees F.

On the average the state receives 50 to 65 inches of rain. Summer is the rainy season, which extends into October in the south. Hurricane season begins in late August. Some hurricanes can bring up to 25 inches of rain. An average of two hurricanes per season reach the Florida peninsula. Most often these storms reach the Atlantic Coast rather than the Gulf Coast.

Address
P.O. Box 490
Port Richey, FL 34673

Phone: 727-816-1890

Fax: 727-816-1888

Email: michael.strivelli@dep.state.fl.us
  • Werner-Boyce Salt Springs State Park Travel Q&A

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