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Venice is composed of 118 small islands dotting the marshy Venetian Lagoon, separated by a network of canals and linked together by a series of bridges. The Grand Canal (pictured) is one of its major thoroughfares.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The region in which Venice now sits was first inhabited in the 10th century BC and stood as a powerful maritime city during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Today, that history melds with the more modern trappings of contemporary Europe.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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More than 500 gondolas ply the canals of Venice, offering one of Europe’s most iconic tourist attractions. Locals also use the boats as water taxies for transportation throughout the city.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Its maze of waterways also affords an opportunity to appreciate a more playful, surreal side of the Italian city, as witnessed by the way the canal reflections distort the buildings.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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A statue of Nicolo Tommaseo, an Italian linguist, journalist, and writer.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Dusk falls over one of the many bridges in Venice.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Food—as you’d expect—reigns in Italy. Places like Harry’s Bar, which made the first beef carpaccio, make for a nice, traditional stop. But at dusk, many wine and deli shops serve small-serving dishes to hordes of locals.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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But you can’t go wrong with just grabbing some street-side gelato.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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As most seasoned travelers will testify, it’s rare for a city that has built up such a reputation to actually live up to the hype…  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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…but Venice exceeds its rep, offering up an indelible atmospheric majesty that’s seldom replicated elsewhere in the world.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
 
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