Vietnam's Cu-Chi Tunnels Photo Gallery

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The Cu-Chi Tunnels lie just outside of Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon) and were one of the many immense tunnel networks used to conceal, house, and hide both Viet Cong soldiers and displaced Vietnamese citizens during the U.S./Vietnam War. This U.S. M41 tank was destroyed by a VC landmine in 1970.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Here a guide demonstrates how the tunnel system was entered, which was narrow enough for a typical Vietnamese's slim build—but impossible for broader people to enter. Once inside, the leafed camouflage completely conceals the entryway.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Another tunnel entrance, this one carved out of the root structure of a tree to take advantage of its natural camouflage. The VC housed hospitals, kitchens, communication centers, and living quarters in its multi-layered tunnel systems. The Cu Chi Tunnels, in particular, served as the VC headquarters during the Tet Offensive of 1968.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Deadly booby traps were set up throughout the tunnels and parts of the surrounding jungle, such as this one here. When the unsuspecting soldier stepped on either end of the long, leaf-covered panel, the trap pivots...  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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...to reveal a bed of foot-long metal spikes anchored into the ground.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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A guide displays examples of the sandals worn by the VC, crafted out of rubber tires.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Other pit traps on display at the Cu-Chi Tunnels, a sort of living museum that testifies to the tenacity, resourcefulness, and perseverance of the Vietnamese. At the end of the tour, you can also shoot off Vietnam-era weapons like an AK-47 or an M-16.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Another tunnel entrance, this one arguably easier to navigate.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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More tunnel booby traps are on display in the open-air museum.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The turret of the U.S. M41 tank disabled by the VC. The U.S. military did launch attacks specifically against the tunnel system, including Operation Crimp, which involved massive carpet bombing of 30-ton explosives from B-52s. They also sent in 30,000 troops as part of Operation Cedar Falls, but to little avail.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
 
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