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Every Monday through Friday, at 9 a.m., the Samoan police force marches along the waterfront of Apia, on the island of Upolu, from the police station to the government building to raise the flag.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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'Ava ceremonies (the Samoa version of the South Pacific stimulant Kava) hold special significance in Samoa. Villages prepare the root when welcoming visitors or gathering for important community meetings.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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Bottles of brined sea slug innards, eaten as a delicacy and all-around home remedy, for sale at the Fugalei Food Market—Upolu's main farmer's market—alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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The Fiafia is like a Samoan version of a Hawaiian Luau. This Fiafia at the historic Aggie Grey's Hotel is the most popular on Upolu and ends with a huge feast that lasts well into the night.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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Many flavors of churches populate the towns and countryside of Samoa, most decorated with a unique island flair. The Safotu Catholic Church on Savai'i is made entirely from coral and river rocks.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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A traditional umu or stone oven: The chief superheats lava rocks over a blazing fire before piling the stones over whole pigs, fish, lamb, and baskets full of taro roots.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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Like many South Pacific islanders, most Samoans wear all white to a Sunday morning church service, and the women make fashion statements with their wide-brimmed white hats.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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Families bury the remains of their elders in elaborate tombs in front of their houses. The more power and prestige a person holds in life, the larger and more elaborate his or her resting place.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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In Samoa, revered tattoo artists use traditional, boar-tusk tattoo combs to create intricate "cloths"—body tattoos that cover the hips and thighs—that symbolize the recipient's acceptance of leadership responsibilities within his community. Bonus knowledge: The English word tattoo comes from the Samoa word tatau, and Samoa is considered the birthplace of modern body art.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
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Traditional necklaces: Red-painted bandanna fruits (ula fala) symbolize the blood of the Samoan people; brown pua tree seeds (ula pua) stand for the land of Samoa; and the white shells (ula sisi) link the wearer to the ocean.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
 
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