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Downtown Philadelphia at night. The skyline of Pennsylvania's largest city is striking, but Philadelphia is best understood at street level, by exploring its historically rich and culturally diverse neighborhoods.  
Credit: Corbis 
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Right in the heart of Center City, Philadelphia's monumental City Hall is the second largest masonry building in the world and the largest municipal building in the United States. The building took 30 years and $24 million to build, finally reaching completion in 1901. A 27-ton bronze sculpture of state founder William Penn tops the structure and is one of 250 made for the Hall by Alexander Calder, grandfather of the famous mobile sculptor Alexander 'Sandy' Calder.  
Credit: Wikimedia 
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Just across from City Hall, Philadelphia's LOVE Park takes its unofficial name (it was originally called John F. Kennedy Plaza) from artist Robert Indiana's famous LOVE sculpture, which was installed in 1976 as part of the city's bicentennial celebration.  
Credit: Andrew Guners/Digital Vision/Getty 
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Independence Hall is one of the nation's most important historic landmarks. Built in 1753 to serve as the Pennsylvania State House, the Hall was the site of the Second Continental Congress and the original Liberty Bell. The Declaration of Independence was approved there, as was the Constitution, which was drafted in the Hall in secret sessions in the summer of 1787.  
Credit: Dan Smith/Wikimedia 
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Citizens Bank Park is the new home of the Philadelphia Phillies, who won the 2008 World Series there, taking the decisive fifth game to the delight of more than 43,000 screaming fans.  
Credit: M. Kennedy/Greater Philadelphia Tourism 
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Looking like a relic of medieval Europe, the Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia's Fairmount neighborhood served as a prison from its completion in 1829 until 1971. The penitentiary was a model for dozens of others worldwide because of its design, which was meant to foster rehabilitation rather than simply punish prisoners with incarceration. Today the penitentiary is a National Historic Landmark and open to visitors year-round.  
Credit: Tom Bernard/Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site 
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The world-renowned Philadelphia Museum of Art is one of the largest art museums in the U.S., housing more than 225,000 pieces that span 2,000 years of history. The museum, which was built for the Centennial Exposition of 1876, was famously featured in the film Rocky when Sylvester Stallone's Rocky Balboa completed an inspiring training run by bounding up the museum's grand stairway and raising his arms triumphantly as he looked down Benjamin Franklin Parkway.  
Credit: Wikimedia 
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Just a few feet away from the Museum of Art stairs that Rocky climbed, you'll find this sculpture commemorating the iconic film character. The statue was actually commissioned by Sylvester Stallone himself as a prop for Rocky III. After the production closed, a debate arose over the artistic value of the sculpture and it was moved to the Spectrum, the city's hockey and basketball arena. It was moved back to the museum for several more film productions, including Rocky V, before being moved back to the Spectrum again. Finally, the sculpture was returned to the Museum of Art and, in a 2006 ceremony, placed permanently on a pedestal.  
Credit: Wikimedia 
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Along with nearby-rival Geno's, Pat's King of Steaks is widely considered one of the best places to try a cheesesteak, Philadelphia's celebrated street food.  
Credit: Bobak Ha'Eri/Wikimedia 
 
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