Papua New Guinea Landscape Photos

 
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There is no other place like it in the world: The island-country of Papua New Guinea, often referred to as PNG, is located in the South Pacific, north of Australia and east of Indonesia. Only slightly larger than California, the country is known for its many plants and animals that are found nowhere else in the world. PNG is primarily covered in tropical rainforest, but the geography is diverse and includes mountains, fertile highlands, wetlands, and long stretches of beach.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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The eastern half of New Guinea island, as well as several large islands and hundreds of small islands and atolls, make up Papua New Guinea. Virtually the entire country is surrounded by coral reefs, which makes it one of the best diving locations in the world.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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Besides the capital of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea has few urban areas. Madang Province, one of 20 provinces in the country, is one of the more developed with high-end resorts that make it a popular tourist destination. The capital, Madang (pictured), is considered to have one of the most beautiful harbors in the South Pacific.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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Known for its long stretches of beach, the island province of New Ireland is a great destination for surfing, snorkeling, diving, game fishing, and even golfing. There are also several festivals including the Luka Barok festival held in late June/early July, at which visitors can watch the ancient tradition of shark-calling, a unique tradition practiced mainly on the west coast of the island.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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Papua New Guinea has several active volcanoes, and eruptions are not rare. Located on the island province of New Britain, Rabaul Volcano is one of the most active in the country. A major eruption in 1994 destroyed the capital city of Rabaul. After relocating many of the services, including the airport, Rabaul remains popular with tourists, particularly for divers and snorkelers.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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A mountain range runs through Papua New Guinea and in many ways defines its landscape. Mount Wilhelm is the tallest peak at 14,793 feet. Although it is a non-technical climb, visitors should not attempt to summit Mount Wilhelm without a guide.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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Mount Hagen waterfall flows down through the Western Highlands Province. Mountains and rivers create natural barriers that caused the population to develop into hundreds of unique tribal cultures, some of which still live much as they have for millennia.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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Although there has been some development in Papua New Guinea, only 12 percent of the population lives in urban areas. The majority lives in villages, mostly in the highlands, and practices subsistence farming.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
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The island of New Guinea has one of the largest swamps in the world. Wetlands surround the major rivers, including the Sepik River (pictured). Flowing 700 miles from the mountains to the Bismarck Sea, Sepik is Papua New Guinea's longest river.  
Credit: Photodisc/Getty 
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With such rugged terrain, most of Papua New Guinea still is not accessible by car. Airplanes are the only form of transportation to many areas in the country.  
Credit: courtesy, Papua New Guinea Tourism 
 
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