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Nightlife in downtown Beirut. Having finally rebuilt after a 15-year civil war that ended in 1990, Lebanon was again rocked by conflict in 2005 and 2006. But resilient Beirutis are known for having a good time even under the most trying circumstances, and now that peace has returned, their city's revitalized downtown buzzes with activity day and night.  
Credit: Bertil Videt/Wikimedia 
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In the evenings, Beirut's Corniche shows off a mellower side of city life. The seafront promenade is full of strolling families, hand-holding lovers, hawkers selling toys and snacks, and travelers taking it all in.  
Credit: austinevan/Flickr 
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This sculpture at the center of Beirut's Martyrs' Square honors Lebanese nationalists killed by the Ottomans during World War I. Right in the heart of downtown Beirut, the square is a focal point for protest. It was the site of anti-Syrian demonstrations during 2005's Cedar Revolution and Hezbollah-led anti-government gatherings in 2007.  
Credit: vladanr/Wikimedia 
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Baalbek, in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, was the site of the ancient Roman city of Heliopolis and some of the empire's grandest temples. Today it's home to some of the best-preserved and most spectacular Roman ruins you'll find anywhere.  
Credit: Martijn Munneke/Wikimedia 
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Perched on the edge of a steep valley, the Lebanese town of Bcharre was the birthplace of poet Khalil Gibran. Founded by Maronite Christians in the 7th century, Bcharre was a stronghold of the Lebanese Forces, a Christian militia, during the Lebanese civil war. Today, the mountain town is a popular stop for travelers thanks to its spectacular setting, the Khalil Gibran Museum, and its proximity to Lebanon's famous cedar forests and the nation's only ski resort.  
Credit: Martijn Munneke/Wikimedia 
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The Mohmmed Al-Amin Mosque in Beirut's Martyrs' Square was built by former Lebanese prime minister Rafik Hariri, who was buried there after his assassination in 2005. Architect Azmi Fakhuri said the blue-domed mosque was inspired by Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul.  
Credit: Anobel Odisho/Wikimedia 
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Tyre, on Lebanon's southern coast, is known for its well-preserved Roman and Phoenician ruins.  
Credit: David Bjoren/Wikimedia 
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Marking the city's westernmost point and the end of the Corniche promenade, Beirut's Pigeon Rocks are a popular destination for both tourists and locals and a great place to catch a Mediterranean sunset.  
Credit: vladanra/Wikimedia 
 
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