Isles of Scilly, England Photo Gallery

 
X
Similar to lighthouses, except with no light, daymarks serve as navigational aids for sailors during daylight hours. The beacon on St. Martin's, the most easterly of Britain's Scilly Isles, is usually the first thing a visitor sees upon arrival from the mainland. It was first erected in 1683.  
Credit: ianmilne/Flick 
X
Fishing is a big draw on the Isles of Scilly. With only five inhabited islands, there's a good chance you can find a cove that has never seen a baited hook. With such diverse sea- and landscapes, plentiful amounts of fishing can be had via shore or by chartering a boat with a local fisherman.  
Credit: ianmilne/Flickr 
X
The St. Mary's Boatmen's Association is a collection of independently owned boats—one of which is The Surprise, a diminutive 60-year-old passenger boat offering trips such as the 'Seabird Special,' a two-hour cruise to spot seabirds on the many rocky outcrops surrounding St. Mary's. The island is the largest of the Scilly Isles, and is home to a small airport with connecting flights to Newquay or Land's End on the British mainland.  
Credit: ianmilne/Flickr 
X
Built by Oliver Cromwell in 1651-52 after the conquest of the Royalist Scillies, this gun tower was erected to protect the shoreline between Bryher and Tresco from an encroaching Dutch fleet during the English Civil War. It is one of the few surviving Cromwellian structures in England.  
Credit: Oli R/Flickr 
X
Sun sets over a maritime daymark in the Scilly Isles. Anchored almost 30 miles off the coast of Cornwall, the Scilly Isles are perhaps one of the best spots to see the sun dip over the Atlantic's western horizon in the entire British Isles.  
Credit: MattBaker/Flickr 
X
Ancient cairns exist throughout many of the islands. These manmade stacks of stone were once used as tombs or astrological signs. Nowadays cairns are used as tools for marking a trail or mountain summit, or just a way of saying, 'I was here,' like these modern-day stone sculptures on a rocky cove in the Scilly Isles.  
Credit: *Emmett*/Flickr 
X
The Scillonian III ferry departs for the Scilly Isles from Penzance, Cornwall's westernmost major town. The photo opportunities after push-off include a front-row view of St. Mary's Church, a prominent feature of the Penzance skyline. Ferry services run from late March through October, and the journey takes 40 minutes.  
Credit: Tim Dobson/Flickr 
X
The amount of tourists on the islands is few due to limited space on Scilly-bound planes and boats. Though St. Mary's is the most populated island—with over 3,000 year-round inhabitants, a boat dock, hospital, and airport—don't just stick to the inhabited islands. Many of the smaller deserted islands make for bountiful snorkeling day-trips, where it'll be just you and the fish.  
Credit: Tim Dobson/Flickr 
X
If you can't find a secluded spot to sunbathe in Scilly, you aren't looking hard enough. There is no shortage of deserted coves and hideaways. Check out Pelistry, Porthcressa, and Town Beach on St. Mary's; Rushy Porth, Appletree Bay, and Pentle Bay on Tresco; Green or Rushy Bay on Bryher; Lawrence's Bay or Great Bay on St. Martin's; or Covean and Periglis on St. Agnes.  
Credit: Tim Dobson/Flickr 
 
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement

Compare Rates to Penzance


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement