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Overcrowded, smoggy, and concrete everywhere—but that's the appeal of Iran’s capital city of Tehran. With a soaring population of nearly 15 million people, the city is an endless maze of activity.  
Credit: farrokhi/Flickr 
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It is not uncommon to encounter locals selling homemade goods or knickknacks on the street. Here a man sells bags on the street corner.  
Credit: kamshots/Flickr 
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Here a man weaves decorative bowls by hand.  
Credit: francisco_monteiro/Flickr 
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The Bazaar of Isfahan (also known as the Grand Bazaar) is one of the world's oldest and largest markets. Dating back to the 17th century, the bazaar is a gold mine for finding genuine Iranian souvenirs.  
Credit: davehighbury/Flickr 
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Dried fruits, herbs, and spices are a frequent inclusion in Iranian cuisine. In most of the local bazaars you'll find a plethora of choices to take back home with you. Iranian saffron is one of the world's most famous and sought after spices for the unique flavor, aroma, and color it brings to a dish.  
Credit: Tom Chambers/Flickr 
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The historic city of Yazd is a must-see for any traveler to Iran. The great architecture and traditional embellishments are a highlight of the narrow streets and lanes that encircle the city center.  
Credit: dynamosquito/Flickr 
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The Jāmeh Mosque of Yazd is the main mosque of the city. The architecture is done in Persian style with vaulted and domed ceilings and adorned with a dazzling display of colorful mosaic tiles.  
Credit: ali reza_parsi,Flickr 
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Originally constructed in the 12th century, the mosque is still a hugely popular gathering place for followers of the Muslim religion.  
Credit: indigoprime/Flickr 
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The village of Masouleh near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea is home to around 800 people. City law dictates that motor vehicles are forbidden, keeping a quiet and peaceful city overlooking the sea.  
Credit: Shahram Sharif/Flickr 
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The architecture is built into the side of a mountain, with the rooftops and terraces all interconnected and used as walkways between.  
Credit: Mehrab1131/Flickr 
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The city of Pasargadae is the final resting place of Cyrus the Great, known as the "father of the Iranian nation." The UNESCO World Heritage Site holds the remains of many important buildings of the era, including a terrace, gatehouse, audience hall, and the palace and gardens.  
Credit: dynamosquito/Flickr 
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Another one of Iran's more famous UNESCO sites is the Persepolis, an ancient Persian city dating back to 500 BC.  
Credit: nomenklatura/Flickr 
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The archaeological ruins are scattered about a large man-made terrace, once the head of the Achaemenid Empire. Crowning the terrace is a set of double staircases and two bull statues with wings and a human head.  
Credit: Scarto/Flickr 
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The highest peak in Iran is Mount Damāvand, a dormant volcano just 40 miles north of Tehran. Surrounded by smaller peaks of the Elburz range, the average time to reach the summit is ten hours by experienced climbers.  
Credit: Hamed Saber,Flickr 
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The Shahsavan are a nomadic tribe in the northwest region of Iran. There are an estimated 15,000 families that are part of the Shahsavan people.  
Credit: ninara/Flickr 
 
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