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The Charles River on its way to Boston Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Brandeis University, and Boston College are all located on the banks of the Charles.  
Credit: Corbis 
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Boston Harbor at night. The sight of the Revolutionaries' famous Tea Party, Boston Harbor has figured prominently in American history since John Smith first landed there in 1614.  
Credit: Digital Vision 
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The Charles River Esplanade and Boston's Back Bay. Though it's one of Boston's toniest neighborhoods and contains some of the best examples of the city's 19th-century architecture, the Back Bay didn't even exist until 1857, when it was created by filling in the Charles River's tidewater flats.  
Credit: Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau 
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Built in 1713, Boston's Old State House is the oldest surviving public building in a city full of architectural treasures.  
Credit: Photodisc 
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The Longfellow Bridge, named for the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, opened in 1906. The bridge connects Cambridge to downtown Boston and is often called the Salt-and-Pepper Bridge because its towers look like salt and pepper shakers.  
Credit: Wikimedia 
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With its shops and markets, Faneuil Hall Marketplace, which also includes North Market, South Market, and Quincy Market, is one of Boston's and the nation's most visited historic sites. The original hall was built in 1742, burned down in 1761, and was rebuilt a year later. It was expanded in 1806, with the addition of a third floor.  
Credit: Photodisc 
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Nineteenth-century brownstones in Boston; the city is renowned for its historic architecture.  
Credit: Hisham Ibrahim/Photographer's Choice/Getty 
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Boston's historic North End. Occupied continuously since the 1630s, the North End is the city's oldest neighborhood. Full of historic landmarks, the North End was also once the center of Boston's Jewish community and its Italian enclave. The North End was cut off from the rest of the city by an elevated highway in the 1950s but has since been reconnected by the notoriously delayed and over-budget Big Dig project, which routed the highway through an underground tunnel.  
Credit: Wikimedia 
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The Paul Revere House. Now a historic landmark in Boston's North End, this colonial-era house was the home of Paul Revere, the patriot and silversmith famous for his role as a messenger in the opening conflicts of the Revolutionary War.  
Credit: Photodisc 
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Home to Boston's beloved Red Sox since it opened in 1912, Fenway Park is one of baseball's most famous and idiosyncratic stadiums. Fenway's giant left field wall, known as the Green Monster, is unique among Major League parks. Fenway is also one of the only stadiums in baseball that still uses a hand-operated scoreboard.  
Credit: Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau 
 
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