X
Once a vicious, lava-spewing volcano, Katmai Caldera is now a peaceful lake-filled formation in Alaska's Katmai National Park. The green waters create a striking contrast against the region's frequent snowfall and azure skies.  
Credit: Roy Wood/National Park Service 
X
To reach this pristine locale within the Pacific Ring of Fire, hop a float plane from Anchorage and fly into Brooks Camp, which resides at the heart of the park. And expect brown and polar bears to greet you upon arrival and once you're out in the wild.  
Credit: Photodisc 
X
The six million acres that compose Denali National Park give a new meaning to the term "as far as the eye can see."  
Credit: Corbis/Denali National Park 
X
Lakes, glaciers, and mountain peaks all have a home in this diverse stretch of Alaskan land. Denali is also a land of quaky plate tectonics, with more than 700 earthquakes a year. Most of the activity occurs in the northern foothills of the Denalis near the town of Kantishna.  
Credit: Oaktown Pete/Flickr 
X
During the harsh winter months, the preferred way of transport is by helicopter.  
Credit: adactio/Flickr 
X
There are numerous helicopter tour companies that will take you to the heart of the park to walk on a glacier, hike a frozen lake, or just sit back and enjoy your bird's-eye view.  
Credit: oi2 
X
Though in recent years it's been replaced with the snowmobile, dog sledding was once a popular means of transport. Now-a-days, the practice is mainly reserved for tourists and as a competitive sport for locals.  
Credit: Corbis 
X
Though many different dog breeds are used to pull sleds, the more popular of the bunch is the husky.  
Credit: jonwick04/Flickr 
X
Aurora borealis is the fancy name for what we commonly know as the northern lights. This phenomenon is caused by 'energetic charged particles' that glow in reaction to the earth's magnetic field. In Alaska, the best time to see their fiery glow is from December to March, when the nights are long and the sky is dark.  
Credit: Beverly & Pack/Flickr 
X
The litany of place names found in the Chugach National Forest reads like an adventurer's honor roll—there's the Kenai Peninsula, where anglers wrestle with 60-pound king salmon, and the Prince William Sound, held in awe by sea kayakers and whale watchers.  
Credit: Tom Brakefield/Digital Vision 
X
Glacier Bay is one of Alaska's more famous national parks. A deep range of contrast runs throughout the park, from snow-covered mountains to fjords and massive glaciers. This diversity makes the area a favorite of outdoor enthusiasts who come to Alaska seeking adventure.  
Credit: National Park Service/Melinda Webster 
X
Those primed for adventure thrive on the adrenaline surge that comes from exploring the inner workings of an ice cave. Many are found throughout Glacier Bay National Park, but the most widely visited is the ice cave on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island. With more than 13,000 feet of passageways and tunnels, it is also one of the largest mapped cave systems in the world.  
Credit: National Park Service/J.Driscoll 
X
Glacier Bay's Reid Glacier is one of the fastest-moving tide-water glaciers in the world. Approximately 11 miles in length, Reid Glacier is known for its bright blue hue.  
Credit: vonlohmann/Flickr 
X
Close-up view of a glacier face  
Credit: National Park Service/Melinda Webster 
X
Wrangell St. Elias National Park & Preserve is named after the two mountain ranges that form it. The region houses an extensive collection of glaciers and ice fields with only two roads cutting through its vast wilderness.  
Credit: National Park Service/Nate Verhanovitz 
 
  • Regional Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement

Compare Rates to Anchorage


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement