Grenada for Nada: A Virtual Tour

X
Spend a full day in layover limbo and any final destination is satisfying to reach. But when your end point is Grenada's Spice Island Beach Resort, all is well with the world. Destined to become a Caribbean icon, each room is either situated on Grand Anse Beach or outfitted with private pools, saunas, and sun decks.  
Credit: courtesy, Spice Island Beach Resort 
X
First stop on a nine-hour tour of the island my first full day in Grenada? Concord Waterfall, where the water flumes out of the dense rainforest at the island's center, falling for about 20 feet before splashing into a brisk pool of clear water where the overheated can swim.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
In Grenada, they say if you toss a handful of seeds out the window, the next day you'll find a garden. The fertile Spice Isle is one of the globe's leading suppliers of spices like cinnamon, gloves, ginger, mace, allspice, orange peel, and nutmeg.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
This boy was the son of the proprietors of Dougaldson Spice Boucan, where we'd stopped after Concord Waterfall to breath in the aromatic realities of Grenada's spice trade.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
This point in northern Grenada was dubbed 'Le Morne de Sauteurs' (Leaper's Hill) by the French. Story goes that the native Caribs retreated here after the island fell to the French, and then leapt to their death rather than surrendering.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Lake Antoine, an 18-acre crater lake, can be found six miles north of Grenville and boasts a salt pond, three idyllic beaches, and a heady flush of wildlife drawn to its varied ecosystem.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Rivers Rum was founded in 1785, and not much has changed since. The sugar cane press is powered by a water wheel, the cane husks are used to boil the pulp, and every one of the 2,000 bottles produced each week is hand poured. And the quality hasn't lessened either; Rivers Rum has to exceed 80 percent alcohol in order to pass out the door.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
The popular hiking and camping spot Grand Etang National Park is dominated by a massive lake of the same name, hemmed in by dense jungle land.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
The Bianca C is a 600-foot Italian cruise ship that sank off the capital city of St. George on October 22, 1961. Now dubbed the Titanic of the Caribbean, the advanced-level dive site is almost too massive to grasp in one trip—but you can descend to 160 feet and swim in cruise liner's (and the Caribbean's deepest) swimming pool.  
Credit: courtesy, Aquanauts Dive 
X
As I followed the amiable dive masters from Aquanauts Dive outfitters along the Bianca C's length, a massive spotted eagle ray appeared on our left flank and stuck with us for most of the dive.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
After the Bianca C dive we regrouped for 45 minutes before taking a second, much shallower dive closer to the island, a landscape teaming with coral and other sea life.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
But you really only need a snorkel and fins to check out Grenada's latest aquatic attraction: the Underwater Sculpture Gallery, a collection of 65 sculptures in Molinier Bay carved and desposited by British artist Jason Taylor, sunk at depths between six and 24 feet.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
The artist drew his inspiration from traditional Grenadian culture, with figures that range from a typist at a desk to a bicyclist in mid-pedal to a ring of 26 children holding hands and a table with a place setting complete with a water pitcher and bowl of fruit.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Let this placid above-water scene offer a bit of scenic respite while catching your breath between skin dives down to check out the sculptures at eye level. I love how the glass-smooth rock gives way instantly to the mangrove jungle that dominates Grenada's interior.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
This is Sienna, who sits at a depth of about 12.5 feet, one of the easier sculptures to reach while holding your breath. Others, like 22.9-foot-deep The Lost Correspondent—the figure typing at desk, required more than my lungs could bear after a long day of diving.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
From the water St. George's port almost looks like a children's toy model, complete with glowing-white doll houses pressed into the spongy, moss-covered jungle surface overlooking a pool of aqua-marine Caribbean water.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
But perhaps the best part of each day was returning to the Spice Island Beach Resort—and waking up there the next day, with the whole of that tiny island outside the sliding glass door.  
Credit: courtesy, Spice Island Beach Resort 
 
  • Related Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement