Colorful Caribbean: A Captivating Photo Gallery

 
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Mount Pelé's eruption in 1902, the most disastrous of the 20th century, sunk more than a dozen ships in Martinique's Saint-Pierre Bay. Today, the tragedy of 100 years ago could not seem farther away; colorful fishing boats flock the docks of white sanded beaches and Saint-Pierre Bay is now a premiere dive spot.  
Credit: West Stock 
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The Ardastra Gardens on New Providence Island are home to the only trained flock of flamingos in the world. The talented birds strut around and flap their pink wings upon command as they perform for crowds in their Bahamian retreat.  
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Adam and Eve actually left paradise for a better life in Negril, Jamaica. Well, maybe that's just a local expression, but there's no denying that Negril is Edenic. And there's not a single high-rise to spoil the scenery; laws forbid buildings to be taller than the tallest palm tree.  
Credit: West Stock 
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Although most shark dives at Caribbean island resorts report few attacks, precautions are still necessary. Shark feeders often don 20-pound (9-kg) chain mail suits as protection from their fierce diners. (Now that's some chain mail you won't find in your in-box.)  
Credit: Corbis 
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There's only one reason to feel crabby in Tobago—crab racing! The tradition started as a grassroots response to the pastime of thoroughbred horseracing. The crabs run sideways as their 'jockeys' use strings (reins) and sticks (crops) to guide them toward the finish line.  
Credit: Corbis 
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Christopher Columbus named the Virgin Islands for the legend of Saint Ursula and her army of 11,000 maidens. (He had a thing for naming his discoveries after saints.) Lore says the beautiful princess formed the army to protect Britain from a tribe of pagan Huns.  
Credit: Corbis 
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Story has it that the Limbo began on slave ships about 500 years ago. Competitions were set up to limber up cramped and stiff muscles. Today, with the steel drum and Calypso music, the dance is practiced at Caribbean festivals. Teresa Marquis from St. Lucia set recent history's world record in 1970 when she limberly slid under a pole raised only six and a half inches from the ground.  
Credit: Corel 
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The most ferocious fish around the reef isn't a shark or a barracuda, but rather the innocent-looking damselfish. Very territorial and aggressive, damselfish will attack intruders of any size. But divers need not worry: damselfish only grow to two to five inches and weigh just a few ounces.  
 
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