Cape Breton, Nova Scotia Photo Gallery

 
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A scenic view from the Cabot Trail, a 185-mile loop around the northern tip of Nova Scotia's Cape Breton Island. The route was completed in 1932 and is acclaimed as one of the most stunning scenic drives in the world. This section of the trail is part of the French-speaking Acadian region of the island and is dotted with colorful Acadian houses. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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Wild Russell lupine flowers are a common sight along the Cabot Trail in spring and summer, blossoming in fields and along the roadside. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The Cape Breton Highlands, an extension of the Appalachian Mountains, cover the length of Cape Breton Island. The Highlands, as they are commonly known, feature many picturesque hiking and biking trails. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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Cape Breton Island is surrounded by water on all sides: the Atlantic Ocean, the Cabot Strait, the Gulf of St. Laurence, and the Bras d'Or Lake, which creates a donut-like hole in the center of the island. The island is home to five public beaches and offers many opportunities for fishing, kayaking, swimming, and other water sports. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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Glenora Inn and Distillery, located in Cape Breton's town of Glenville on the Ceilidh Trail, is North America's only single-malt whiskey distillery. The establishment also includes an inn, a pub, and a fine-dining restaurant. The lively pub can be a wonderful place to catch some of Cape Breton's best Celtic music acts. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The village of Judique, founded in 1775, is the oldest Scottish settlement on Cape Breton Island. To celebrate the region's Scottish heritage, locals decided to create the Tartan Gardens, shown here, which are designed in the pattern of a traditional Scottish tartan. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Park is a detailed recreation of an original French fortress from the site, which was captured by British troops in 1758 and destroyed soon after. The new fortress, based just outside the modern town of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island, is a major Canadian tourist attraction and features frequent guided tours and historical reenactments. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The 18th-century-style buildings at the Fortress of Louisbourg were painstakingly reconstructed from original plans, and many made use of the original buildings' stones. The reconstruction project began in 1961, providing work to miners from a local coal mine that had recently been shut down. The miners were taught many French masonry techniques from the 1700s in order to reconstruct the intricate buildings. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The Victoria County Courthouse is located in the village of Baddeck, on the northern shore of the Bras d'Or Lake. Though the village houses fewer than 1,000 full-time residents, it is the region's tourism center in the summer and fall months, with an abundance of restaurants, inns, and shops. The town was also home to Alexander Graham Bell's summer retreat, and now houses a National Historic Site dedicated to the famous inventor of the telephone. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
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The coast of Cape Breton is home to a wide range of wildlife, including moose, bears, bald eagles, and great blue herons. Each summer, visitors can embark on whale-watching tours in the Atlantic from the island's docks. (Text by Kathy Hawkins)  
Credit: Jeff Hawkins 
 
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