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For an epic, intimate tour through the Canadian Rockies, head to Toronto and hop on The Canadian for a cross-country train ride that carves through the picturesque mountains and countryside of small towns. Your final stop is the coastal city of Vancouver, British Columbia.  
Credit: Melanie Fordham 
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It should come as no surprise that shops in Vancouver sell more sporting goods per capita than in any other city on the continent. As the largest metropolis in British Columbia, Vancouver serves as the gateway to the wilderness, but, in reality, there's no real reason to leave town.  
Credit: Photodisc 
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Called "The Galapagos of the North," the geographically isolated Queen Charlotte Islands of British Columbia have 39 unique plant and animal species, among them the famed Queen Charlotte owl.  
Credit: Image Source/Getty 
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With a laid-back and inviting fishing-village feel, Cowichan Bay, British Columbia, has become a hive for tourists wishing to commune with nature. Many locals in the cozy village live aboard floating homes and make a living working on the water. For great places to dine in the Cowichan Valley, you needn't go far—the bay provides the freshest seafood around.  
Credit: Rich Reid/Getty 
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Like much of the countryside in Canada, the land uphill from Cowichan Bay is sprawling vineyards and vast farmland. Canada is particularly famous for its ice wine, grown mostly in Ontario.  
Credit: Nancy Falconi/Photographer’s Choice 
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Lining the Capilano Suspension Bridge in Vancouver are statuesque Douglas fir trees known for their forked cones and fragrant needles. The expansive bridge is 450 feet long and was originally made with hemp rope and planks of cedar wood. The bridge has since been remodeled, and the entire 230-foot-high bridge is open to be explored—a braggable feat for any acrophobe.  
Credit: Canadian Tourism Commission 
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When three railroad workers happened upon several hot springs in Alberta in 1883, little did they know they had discovered what would become the country's first national park. In 1885, after some dispute over land ownership, the springs and the surrounding area became Banff National Park.  
Credit: Daryl Benson/Digital Vision 
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Explorer Tom Wilson came upon these glassy waters, which local natives called the "Lake of Little Fishes," in 1882. He called it Emerald Lake, but two years later it was renamed Lake Louise in honor of Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise Caroline Alberta.  
Credit: b1ubb/Flickr 
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The Icefields Parkway flaunts 143 miles of staggering mountain scenery, passing through both Banff and Jasper national parks and unfurling along the Continental Divide through a citadel of burly peaks (many more than 11,000 feet high), broad valleys, raging rivers, serpentine trails, expansive ice fields, and indigenous wildlife. This ravishing road had modest beginnings as a single track of gravel cut through the Canadian Rockies. The road was later widened and paved during the 1960s, as tourist traffic on the parkway started to reach a fever pitch. A half-century later, Highway 93 sees more than half a million visitors each year.  
Credit: Donovan Reese/Photodisc 
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The varied terrain of Saskatchewan's Prince Albert National Park begins at the edge of the great Canadian prairies and moves into the dense boreal woodlands of the north. The hilly landscape is dotted with ponds and trenched by streams, and at the heart of the park is a series of large glacier-gouged lakes, linked by fast rivers. Whatever path you choose, it's likely you'll find yourself alone in the heart of this million-acre wilderness.  
Credit: Tourism Saskatchewan 
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A 90-minute drive northwest of Toronto takes you to the Georgian Triangle. Once there, sit on the southern shores of Georgian Bay in the shadow of the Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve stretching 450 miles from Lake Ontario to the Bruce Peninsula. No better vantage point takes in the red, yellow, and golden hues of the sumacs, oaks, and aspens that cover the escarpment.  
Credit: Philip Kramer/Photodisc 
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Waterfalls, wetlands, and mountains lie within easy reach of European-flavored Quebec. About 25 miles east of the city near the Beaupré shore of the St. Lawrence, the waterfall at Canyon Sainte-Anne cascades 244 feet. Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area, Saint-Joachim, is about 35 minutes east of Quebec City. Here, there are nature trails through wetlands and a path to the mountain's summit. At Jacques-Cartier National Park, about 30 minutes north of the city in the Laurentian Mountains, summer canoeing, kayaking, mountain biking, and hiking are the big attractions.  
Credit: Taylor S. Kennedy/National Geographic 
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Quebec's Cap Gaspé is the ending point of the newly established International Appalachian Trail. The Appalachians plunge spectacularly into the sea at Forillon National Park.  
Credit: archer10/Flickr 
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Open seven days a week, Montreal's Atwater Market is a haven for the local farmers' bounty. Since 1933, Atwater has been selling fish, baked goods, flowers, cheeses, and vegetables to thousands of locals and tourists alike.  
Credit: Carla Baker 
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Perhaps best known for housing the hundreds of guests who attended the nuptials between Canadian Celine Dion and her manager-husband, the Notre-Dame Basilica in Montreal was the first Gothic Revival–style church to be built in Canada. With deep-crimson stained-glass windows, elaborate gold trimmings, and a 7,000-pipe organ, it's surprising that it took only 35 months for craftsmen to complete the work on the original structure. The best time to visit is early morning, when the light from the rising sun reflects throughout.  
Credit: Lacy Morris 
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More than a thousand icebergs are estimated to float through the waters off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador each year, gradually disappearing as they melt.  
Credit: natalielucier/Flickr 
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More is more in Nova Scotia. The maritime province holds claim to some of the world's most bizarre superlatives, including the World's Largest Blueberry, the World's Largest Ax, the World's Largest Salmon, and the World's Largest Wooden Nickel. In addition, Nova Scotia has a natural wonder that is also ranked among the world's greatest: The Bay of Fundy experiences the world's highest tides.  
Credit: Dale Wilson/Photographer’s Choice 
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Long ago on a dark night in October, a ship sailing in a cove near Nova Scotia became caught in a violent storm after running aground on Halibut Rock aside Lighthouse Point. The ship's crew climbed the masts in an attempt to escape the raging waves, but in the end they were outdone by the violent storm. All perished except one woman who managed to swim ashore. Her name was Peggy, and she was pulled from the water by a man and nursed back to health. Love followed. People came to hear of her idyllic love story, thus referring to the town as Peggys Cove, which stuck … or so legend has it.  
Credit: miquitos/Flickr 
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Another legend tells of an island off the coast of Nova Scotia containing the buried treasure of Captain William Kidd. In 1795, an explorer tried to unearth the Scottish pirate's riches but gave up after 25 feet of digging. So the "money pit" remains, fortune and all … or so they say.  
Credit: jhoc/Flickr 
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Nova Scotia's tight roads are tailor-made for two-wheeled travel. They wind through highlands, over dikes, past rocky coastline, and through historic towns like Lunenburg, an 18th-century seafaring community and UNESCO World Heritage site.  
Credit: Jeremy Hetzel/Flickr 
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Along this quirky elbow of the Atlantic, you can see wondrous cliffs of red sandstone and—sometimes—walk on miles of pebble-strewn beach you'll share only with the birds. At other times, islands exist where a long peninsula had been just a few hours before. It's strange for sure, but it makes for great touring. Driving west from Nova Scotia toward Maine, the route reveals stunning coastal vistas, friendly fishing villages, uninhabited forests, wildlife watching, and plenty of opportunities to feast on the bounties of the sea.  
Credit: Alan Copson/Photographer's Choice 
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Ivvavik National Park, in the northwest corner of the Yukon Territory, offers a beautiful setting for caribou-watching adventures. In August, trek through the craggy peaks of the British Mountains, just as the summer leaves start to change. This is the perfect vantage point from which to watch a moving herd. If you prefer to view the caribou from the water, join a cruise along the Firth River in July. Beginning in the high alpine meadows of the British Mountains, the river winds through deep canyons and vast tundra valleys. Also expect to see Dall sheep, musk ox, and moose along the river, plus beluga whales and seals on the coast.  
Credit: Ann Manner/Digital Vision 
 
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