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The Reclining Buddha at Wat Pho measures in at 150 feet long and just under 50 feet tall. Its eyes and feet are decorated with mother of pearl, and its body is covered in gold plating, designed to illustrate the passing of Buddha into Nirvana.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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This centuries-old temple is said to be the birthplace of Thai massage, as evidenced by this engraving that displays pressure points in the human body. Wat Pho hosts a traditional massage school, where hour-long treatments cost around $20 U.S.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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There's no separating Bangkok from its storied past and its deeply rooted religions, but in every other way the Thai capital is rooted in the 21st century. Case in point: a Namaste-ing Ronald McDonald, left, and a sculpture at Wat Pho, right.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Taking unregistered migrants into account, Bangkok's population is estimated to be around 15 million—almost as crowded as the city's full Thai name: Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Yuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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In addition to the city's famed food stands, Bangkok hosts a variety of night markets, including Pak Klong Talad (the flower market), a cacophonous affair where local shoppers buy bushels of flowers for religious rites…  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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…as well as bouquets wrapped in newspaper.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The Saphan Phut Night Market—frequented mostly by young Thais—sells everything from fried grasshoppers to used jeans to men's and women's underwear.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Around Phra Chan (meaning 'moon') Road, a daily Amulet Market occupies the sidewalks, where Thais purchase small religious charms and traditional medicines.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Bangkok has been dubbed by many as 'The Venice of the East' due its large network of canals. Whether spending time in the famed floating market in Taling Chan District or just sight-seeing from one of the many tourist canal boats, the waterways make a great escape from the city's sometimes-overwhelming urban chaos.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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This massive red teak arch outside of Wat Suthat Temple served as the central support for a ceremonial swing anchored to the top of the arch. During the annual rice festival, teams of men would ride the swing, which would arc as high as 82 feet, in an attempt to grab a bag of silver coins with their teeth. Due to injuries and deaths, the swing was dismantled in 1932.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The Golden Mount, or Phu Khao Thong, was the tallest point in Bangkok until the 1960s. And while the modern skyscrapers dwarf the structure today, climbing up it still affords a stunning perspective on the city, from the urban horizon to the smaller details, like this garland of flowers.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Not all shrines and temples have to be awe-inspiring to provide respite—as this dog typifies by cooling itself in the fountain of a small shrine near Chinatown.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
 
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