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Sailors who first spotted 'The Pinnacles'—scattered along a stretch of Nambung National Park's Red Desert—thought they were ancient ruins. The limestone pillars are estimated to be as many as 30,000 years old.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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Extending 2,000 km along the coast of Queensland, the Great Barrier Reef is the world's largest living structure. Coral forms the basis of the reef, while 1,500 species of fish and 4,000 species of mollusks call the reef home.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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Framed by the distinctive profile of the so-called 'Coathanger Bridge,' the blindingly white segments of the Sydney Opera House resemble wind-filled spinnakers like those on yachts in Sydney Harbor.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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Western Australia supports more than 8,000 species of wildflowers. From August to November, the area in and around Perth blossoms into a vibrant array.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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Anangu aboriginals believe it bad luck to disrupt sacred Uluru (Ayers Rock), the world's largest monolith. Park authorities often receive red stones in the mail from visitors returning 'souvenirs' that brought them bad luck.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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The dolphins of Shark Bay, Western Australia, regularly swim right up to the shore. In 1964, a local fisherwoman began hand-feeding the dolphins, a practice that has since become a tourist institution.  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
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The opal-mining outpost of Coober Pedy lies almost entirely underground, sheltering its residents from the scorching climes of the South Australian outback. Appropriately, the settlement's aboriginal name means 'White Man in Hole.'  
Credit: Australian Tourist Commission 
 
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