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Thailand contains more than 30,000 Buddhist temples. Common types include wats, which serve as schools, religious institutions, and even hospitals; and prasats, which hold royal functions. Some date back as far as the 5th century.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Cochin, the Queen of the Arabian Sea, became a significant trading port in the 14th century after massive flooding separated the village from the Indian mainland. The city was once the battleground of European powers hoping to control Indian trade. Today, it's an aesthetic collage of Portuguese, Dutch, English, and Chinese influences.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Archaeologists have unearthed bamboo combs and baskets dating back to the Jomon Period (ca. 10,000 B.C.-ca. 300 B.C.), proving bamboo groves have flourished in Japan since the island's earliest times. The versatile material has been used to make traditional roofs, samurai weapons, drainpipes, musical instruments, and decorative fans and umbrellas, to name a few.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Rudyard Kipling described his initial view of Myanmar as 'a golden mystery … a beautiful, winking wonder that blazed in the sun, of a shape that was neither Muslim dome nor Hindu temple spire.' And the Shwezigon Pagoda only heightens that mystery; it allegedly contains a tooth and several bones of Buddha.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Asian dance is rooted both in the natural and spiritual. Many forms derive their style from Hindu and Buddhist religious traditions, using precise movements of the head and limbs to act out poems, dramas, and myths.  
Credit: Hollingsworth Studios 
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Monks were a fundamental part of the Cambodian landscape until the Khmer Rouge regime in 1975, one of the world's most horrific reigns of terror. In an attempt to decimate Cambodian history and Buddhism during this four-year stretch, over 50,000 monks were killed. As a result, today's Cambodian monks have had to completely relearn the religion's education and practices.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Tucked in southern China, Guilin is most renown for its scenery and its traditional cormorant fishing. Flat bamboo boats float along the Li River as the fishermen fling large black birds over the water, and the trained cormorants return to the boats with fish in beak.  
Credit: West Stock 
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Rice is the staple food of Indonesia and the rice festival is one of the year's most celebrated events, dedicated to the rice god, Dewi Sri. Indonesians have almost as many different words for rice as Eskimos do for snow.  
Credit: Digital Stock 
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The perfectly symmetrical 12,000-foot cone of Mount Fiji is Asia's legendary icon, and has been a spiritual fixture for the Japanese since ancient times. Until 1892, the mountain's only climbers were pilgrims out to test their endurance. Today, the summit is open to any and all during the climbing season of July and August.  
Credit: Digital Stock 
 
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