Exotic Landscapes Photo Gallery

 
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Despite Tibet's brutal history, the land remains a source of spirituality to its inhabitants. The rugged, unadulterated 'rooftop of the world' entices travelers the world over with its near inaccessibility and aura of mystery.  
Credit: Abrahm Lustgarten 
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The Mediterranean has carved secluded beaches, caves, and tunnels out of Algarve's rugged cliffs along Portugal's coast. The red-ochre sandstone offers a striking counterpart to the azure ocean that laps at its base.  
Credit: Credit: Corel 
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Legendary Viking Eric the Red named Greenland—a deceptive name since the two-mile thick inland ice is the second largest ice cap in the world. Now that travelers can visit and leave before the cold really sets in, the island is heralded as a snow-lover's playground.  
Credit: DigitalStock 
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Easter Island is the most remote inhabited island, but its images are immediately recognizable. The hundreds of colossal statues (moai) that speckle the island remain a mystery; how and why were these massive monoliths carved and transported around the island?  
Credit: WestStock 
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With 20,000-foot Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa, and the deepest fresh-water lake in the world, Tanzania's landscape understands extremes.  
Credit: WestStock 
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Not only are the exultant sandstone turrets of Meteora—1,300 feet above the surrounding Thessalian Plain—a challenging climb, but atop resides a collection of unassuming monasteries that date back to as early as the 11th century.  
Credit: Abrahm Lustgarten 
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Although tucked between the giants of China and India, Nepal makes up for tight borders with towering heights. The staggering Himalayan elevation make the descents into mirror lakes such as Nam Tso Lake—'Lake of Heaven'—all the more impressive.  
Credit: Abrahm Lustgarten 
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Stonehenge conveys its architects' resourcefulness; they used deer antler to dig the ditch, cow shoulder blades to shovel, and transported 80 stones at four tons each over 240 miles—and this was just the inner circle. No wonder it took 1,000 years to complete.  
Credit: DigitalStock 
 
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