Photos of the World's Creepiest Places

 
X
Bran (a.k.a. Dracula's Castle) in Transylvania was the 15th-century home of Prince Vlad Tepes. He punished invaders by piercing them with wooden stakes, earning the name 'Vlad the Impaler.'  
Credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock 
X
Isla de las Munecas, or the Island of Dolls, is located in a swamp-like island south of Mexico City, Mexico. Legend has it that in the 60s a little girl drowned in the island's waters. A local found several dolls floating in the water and became convinced that it was a paranormal sign. He started to collect the dolls and hang them from the trees in hopes that they would attract spirits to keep the little girl company and protect the area from further tragedy.  
Credit: Esparta/Flickr 
X
This 'city of the dead' is just one of many above-ground cemeteries in New Orleans. Because the Big Easy is practically at sea level, it's hard to keep a casket buried—it's not unheard of for coffins to float on a rainy day.  
Credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock 
X
Located in a suburb of the Czech Republic's Kutná Hora, the Sedlec Ossuary, or Church of Bones, is a Gothic-style church dating back to 1400. Since it was being built next to a graveyard, the lower level was used as an ossuary for the graves that were dug up during construction. In 1870, a woodcarver named Frantisek Rint was hired to put the now massive piles of bones into some sort of order. The result was one of the most intriguing churches in the world, said to hold the bones of nearly 40,000 people.  
Credit: lyng883/Flickr 
X
Prague's Old Jewish Cemetery contains more than 12,000 tombstones, with many additional bodies lurking beneath. The oldest grave dates back to 1493; the last burial took place in 1787.  
Credit: cphoffman42/Flickr 
X
Auschwitz was a concentration camp from 1942 to 1944, the largest of its kind. The camp's commandant, Rudolf Höss, claimed that nearly three million people had died there, though new figures estimate it closer to 1.1 million. The grounds and most of the buildings that remain intact are open for tours, but reservations should be made more than two weeks in advance due to the high volume of traffic.  
Credit: ryarwood/Flickr 
X
Allegations that Alcatraz was escape-proof weren't exactly true. In the prison's 30-year history, 34 men attempted to escape in 14 incidents; 29 men were caught. The missing five were assumed dead, but their true fate is a mystery.  
Credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock 
X
The Hill of Crosses in Lithuania is a national pilgrimage center dating back to 1831. Over the years, crosses, crucifixes, rosaries, Virgin Mary statues, and effigies have been left by Catholic pilgrims as a Christian devotion and memorial to Lithuanian identity.  
Credit: londoncyclist/Flickr 
X
Some claim Stonehenge was an ancient temple. Others say it was an astronomical observatory for noting significant events. Another theory suggests it was burial place for the elite.  
Credit: Boris Jeremy Woodhouse/PhotoDisc 
X
The tomb of King Tut sits in the Valley of the Kings, a graveyard of sorts for the most powerful pharaohs of ancient Egypt. The site is still under excavation, as many new tombs are still being discovered. The complexity of the existing tombs took extensive labor to construct and required decades to complete.  
Credit: zolakoma/Flickr 
X
Skulls, rib cages, and tibias create corridors of bones in the catacombs of Paris. Ovecrowded cemeteries in the 18th century caused severe hygiene problems. Bodies were exhumed and transferred to the tunnels, which can be toured today.  
Credit: Hemera/Thinkstock 
 
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement