Rivers, Lakes, and Oceans of the World Photo Gallery

 
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Explorer Tom Wilson was looking for what the Indians called 'Lake of Little Fishes' when he came upon the waters he renamed 'Emerald Lake.' Two years later it became 'Lake Louise' in honor of the Governor General's wife, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta.  
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The northeast coast of the Dominican Republic is considered the windsurfing capital of the world because of its wild, unpredictable tides. Brownson Trough, just beside the island, is the second deepest oceanic valley on earth.  
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Legend has it that Iguazu Falls resulted from a forest god's wrath upon a warrior in love. The fighter and his lover tried to escape down the river, only to be thwarted when the angry god collapsed the riverbed, creating the falls.  
Credit: Argentina Secretary of Tourism 
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New Zealand's Wakatipu Lake derives its name from the legend of a goblin who lives below the surface. Believers point to the unusual five-inch rise and fall in the lake's water level—according to them, the goblin's breathing causes it.  
Credit: New Zealand Tourism 
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The 1,506,539 acres of Everglades National Park often seem calm and peaceful on the surface, but it's the only place in the world where both alligators and crocodiles cohabitate.  
Credit: Mary McCulley 
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Scotland's Loch Ness may be most famous for Nessie, but it owns bragging rights to more than its monster. Holding more water than all the reservoirs and lakes in Britain, the lake is one of Europe's biggest freshwater systems.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Lake Titicaca, the world's highest navigable lake, is actually a union of two bodies of water, in two different countries. Peru's Lago Pequeno and Lago Huinaymarca in Bolivia are linked by the Straits of Tiquina.  
 
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