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Sure, ice covers 700,000 square miles—almost 85 percent—of Greenland at an average thickness of 5,000 feet (1,500 m). But, that's not to say it isn't a pretty wild place to visit. Check out these guys—how often, after all, do you get to walk on water?  
Credit: Index Stock 
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The Madonna of polar animals, the Arctic fox changes hair colors with the seasons. Its fur is dark during summer months, but come winter, it turns white to offer a camouflage in the snow.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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Eager to watch the summer sun set in Norway? Head south and stay up late! In northern Norway, the sun remains above the horizon from May to July, and in the south, daylight lasts until 11pm. Conversely, Nords in the Arctic Circle don't even see the sun rise from November to January.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
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You're likely to glimpse a beluga on a whale-watching trip in Baffin Bay—the graceful creatures are the most popular whales in Canada's waters. They have even been spotted swimming in rivers in the summer.  
Credit: Corbis 
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The Aurora Borealis (or Northern Lights) has sparked tales ranging from the mystical to the extraterrestrial. There is, of course, a scientific explanation: the lights occur when energetic particles from outside the atmosphere interact with atoms of the upper atmosphere.  
Credit: Corel 
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At the time Iceland was settled (somewhere around 1,000 years ago), foxes were the only land mammals native to the island. Since then, reindeer, domestic farm animals, and a host of rodents have been introduced. But to this day there are still no reptiles or amphibians on Iceland.  
Credit: Brian Liu 
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The polar bear is dressed for Arctic weather with a fur coat and a four-inch-thick blubber layer, but you may get a chill just from watching them in Churchill, Canada—home to more polar bears than anyplace else in the world.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
 
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