X
Angel fish, like this one seen in the waters of Grand Cayman Islands, may be diver's and snorkeler's best friend; they typically stay in waters shallower than 130 feet and display bold, seemingly fearless behavior, even around human interlopers.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Found in every ocean save the Arctic Sea, sea turtles use the earth's magnetic field to navigate the globe's waters—and, it seams, to swim away from underwater photographers diving in Belize's barrier reef system.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
This tiny squid was swimming just off the dock at Grand Cayman's Sunset House, part of a huge school of mating brethren. Caribbean squid don't typically start mating until the final weeks of their life.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Sea anemones such as this one off the Caymans are predatory animals that adhere to the coral, emitting a poisonous mixture of toxins that paralyzes its prey as they swim by. Only clown fish (think Nemo) are immune.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Though nocturnal foragers, squirrel fish such as this long-spined variety are some of the most commonly-spotted in the Caribbean like Belize's Ambergris Caye. By vibrating their swim bladders, the fish create clicking and grunting sounds believed to help ward off predators.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
X
Caribbean reef octopus like this one in Cozumel ensnare their prey by spreading its webbed arms to form a canopy to trap its target.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
X
The seahorse (pictured) and the pipefish are the only two aquatic species in which the male—not the female—become impregnated.  
Credit: PhotoDisc 
X
The distinctive geometric pattern on its back and its aquiline profile explain why this graceful creature is named a spotted eagle ray. Fully grown, it can have up to an eight-food wing span and a total length of up to 16 feet. This one, shot in Grenada near the Bianca C wreck, is about 12 feet long.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
 
  • Regional Galleries
  • Related Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement