What to do in Tok River State Recreation Site

Tok is the gateway to Alaska. This small town (pop. 1000) is located only 92 miles from the Canada-US border on the ALCAN Highway. Tok is situated in the upper Tanana River Valley, near the foot hills at the end of the Alaska Range. To the north and east of Tok, the famous "40 Mile Country" stretches up to the Yukon River. This land contains historic gold mines, wildlife, woodlands, wide interior Alaskan rivers, and modern day Alaskan pioneers and prospectors. South of Tok, the traveler enters the Copper River Valley, which eventually terminates at Prince William Sound. Westbound travelers can continue on to Fairbanks. The Tok area gives visitors entering Alaska by way of the Alaska Highway their first opportunity to explore the Alaska Range. Summers are very short here in Interior Alaska, but they are warm and dry with long daylight hours.

Situated on the east bank of the Tok River, this park provides river boating and float trip opportunities to visitors. Across the river from the campground is the burned area of the 1990 Tok River Fire. Campers can also visit the Alaska Public Lands Information Center located in Tok.

Recreation
There are 43 campsites, ten of which will accommodate motorhomes up to 60 feet in length. Facilities include a picnic shelter, drinking water, a walking trail, telephone, and latrines. A group campfire area is provided on the sandy beach of the Tok River.

Location
The site is 4.5 miles east of Tok at mile 1309 of the Alaska Highway.

Climate
The climate in Alaska varies with terrain and region. The south-central region of the state is most temperate because it is protected from cold northern winds by the Alaska Range. The large bodies of water that lies closely to this area create a stabilizing factor for the air temperature. Southeast Alaska is wet. An average of 80 inches of rain comes to this region directly from the Gulf of Alaska.

In contrast to the southeastern region, the interior receives very little precipitation. The winters are long in this region with spring, summer and fall taking place from May through September. The western coast of Alaska experiences long, cold winters and short, chilly summers. This area is very far north and at the mercy of huge water bodies that don't warm. Southwestern Alaska experiences foggy, wet summers with high temperatures reaching 60 degrees F. Winters are severe on this long peninsula of land with storms rising from the surrounding waters frequently. The average rainfall for the region is 75 inches/year.

Address
3700 Airport Way
Fairbanks, AK 99709

Phone: 907-451-2695

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  • Tok River State Recreation Site Travel Q&A

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