What to do in Sycamore State Park

Sycamore State Park lies in the vast fertile till plains of western Ohio in the Wolf Creek Valley. The original forest contained magnificent oaks, walnut, maple, ash, wild cherry and many other tree species. The forest abounded with wild turkey, deer, elk and bison. Long before any permanent settlement was made in the area, its beauty and fertility were well known in the Kentucky settlements and to the people east of the Alleghenies.

Settlement and development of the valley soon brought an end to the forest and game. Farm production in the area was greater than anywhere else in Ohio by 1880. Today, through conservation efforts, the rich fertile farmlands are now yielding to second growth forests. The huge sycamores lining the banks of Wolf Creek give the park its name. The increasing wildlife population includes red fox, deer, woodchuck, raccoon, coyote in addition to a variety of songbirds and waterfowl. The woodlots and meadows harbor diverse colonies of wildflowers including spring beauties, wild blue phlox, ironweed and goldenrod.

At one time, the land comprising Sycamore State Park was purchased by a development corporation to build a housing project. When the corporation was unable to complete the construction, the lands were offered to the state of Ohio. Sycamore was dedicated as a state park in November 1979.

Picnicking is popular at Sycamore State Park. The Overlook Picnic Area boasts a grand picnic shelter with doors and two large fireplaces making it available for year-round use. The shelter may be reserved or available on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are available from February 1 until November 30.

The 3-mile Ghost Hedge Nature Trail offers the hiker an opportunity to explore the Wolf Creek Valley. Giant sycamore trees form a picturesque canopy over the trail. The 1.5-mile Beech Ridge Trail explores the surrounding woodlots and meadows. An additional trail connects these two trails to create 8 miles of hiking opportunities. Horsemen can enjoy 15 miles of bridle trail, including the snowmobile routes when not snow covered. The trails pass through scenic meadows and woodlots.

The park's scenic ponds offer opportunities for hand-power boating only. Canoes and rowboats are suitable for the park's quiet waters. Anglers will enjoy good catches of largemouth bass, bluegill and catfish in the park's ponds. Wolf Creek offers excellent stream fishing for smallmouth bass.

Group areas are available to organized groups on a reservation basis. Group Camp "A" contains several basic sleeping shelters, restrooms, grills and a large barn with electric. This area is completely accessible by wheelchair. Group Camp "B" is for tent camping only. Electric service, fire ring and picnic tables are available.

Hunting is permitted on nearly 1,500 acres of parkland with outstanding squirrel and deer hunting opportunities. A valid Ohio fishing and / or hunting license is required.

Contact the park office for camping and picnicking details.

Recreation
Outdoor activities at Sycamore State Park include fishing, hiking, horseback riding, picnicking, hunting, snowmobiling, sledding, ice-skating, cross-country skiing, ice fishing and several camping options that include group and horse camp.

Location
Sycamore State Park rests just west of Trotwood, Ohio which is a suburb of Dayton. Access is from North Diamond Mill Road.

Climate
This state has four distinct seasons and a brilliant fall foliage display in it southern woods during mid October. Winter lasts from December through February with average temperatures near 25 degrees F. Low temperatures dip to single digits, but do not often drop below zero. Northern regions of the state receive average snowfall amounts of 55 inches, while the central and southern regions of the state receive lesser amounts with averages near 30 inches. This difference is caused by lake-affect moisture patterns.

Spring temperatures begin to warm the landscapes of Ohio by mid March and are in full swing by April. Temperatures range from 40 through 70 degrees F through the spring months. This season often brings the most rainfall, before the drying heat of summer. Summer can be extremely hot and humid in the interior of Ohio. Temperatures reach above 90 degrees F frequently through July and August. Cooler fall temperatures don't reach the region until mid to late September. This is a pleasant time to visit as the air is crisp with low humidity levels. Ohio's annual precipitation usually reaches slightly above 50 inches.

Address
4675 N. Diamond Mill Road
Trotwood, OH 45426

Phone: 937-854-4452

  • Sycamore State Park Travel Q&A

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