What to do in Susquehannock State Forest

The Susquehannock State Forest derives its name from the Susquehannock Indian Tribe which at one time claimed practically all of the land in this region. The forest contains 262,000 acres primarily in Potter County, with parts in Clinton and McKean Counties.

As a part of the statewide forest protection system, one forest fire observation tower is located within the area. From this tower, wildfires are reported for all land, state or private, to the forest headquarters by radio.

A total of 180 miles of the state forest roads and approximately 89 miles of foot trails are maintained on the Susquehannock State Forest. The western section of the Coudersport-Jersey Shore Pike, Pennsylvania Route 44, is a Scenic Highway that bisects the Forest. Some of the finest views in Pennsylvania can be seen from this highway and the State Forest roads leading from it. The Susquehannock State Forest has a special multi-use trail for motorized vehicles. This thirty-five mile loop trail is for the use of all terrain vehicles and during the winter, snowmobiles.

The Pennsylvania Lumber Museum, operated by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, is located on US 6 between Coudersport and Galeton. This museum boasts a full-size logging camp and sawmill. The camp includes a combination bunkhouse, kitchen and dining hall, timekeepers office, carpenter shop, blacksmith and sawfiler shop, stable and tack room, and an engine barn for the Shay logging railroad engine.

The Susquehannock State Forest derives its name from the Susquehannock Indian Tribe which at one time claimed practically all of the land in this region. The forest contains 262,000 acres primarily in Potter County, with parts in Clinton and McKean Counties.

The original forest was cutover from the late 1800's through the 1920's. Since then, a new forest has emerged from the barren and burned remnants. This new forest remains primarily hardwoods. Due to the vast cuttings made in the old forest, the new forest has a larger percentage of trees demanding more light such as cherry and ash. This new forest is being managed by foresters on a sustained yield basis for timber products, watershed protection, wildlife needs, aesthetics and recreation.

As a part of the statewide forest protection system, one forest fire observation tower is located within the area. From this tower, wildfires are reported for all land, state or private, to the forest headquarters by radio. Light aircraft are utilized to detect wildfires in those areas not covered from the tower. Continued protection of the forest from wildfire, coupled with good management, will serve to make this forest more valuable and more able to meet the requirements of multiple use.

Recreation
A total of 180 miles of the state forest roads and approximately 89 miles of foot trails are maintained on the Susquehannock State Forest. Practically all important roads and trails are marked with signs. The western section of the Coudersport-Jersey Shore Pike, Pennsylvania Route 44, is a Scenic Highway that bisects the Forest. Some of the finest views in Pennsylvania can be seen from this highway and the State Forest roads leading from it. This road system is used by sightseers, hunters and fishermen.

In the forested hills and valleys of the Susquehannock State Forest is the 89-mile Susquehannock Hiking Trail system. This system was created by joining together a number of shorter, older foot trails to form a large oval with US 6 6 at the northern edge and extending about twenty-one miles below the Potter-Clinton County line at the southern edge. The distance from east to west edge varies from four to ten miles.

The Susquehannock State Forest has a special multi-use trail for motorized vehicles. This thirty-five mile loop trail is for the use of all terrain vehicles and during the winter, snowmobiles.

The Pennsylvania Lumber Museum, operated by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, is located on US 6 between Coudersport and Galeton. This museum boasts a full-size logging camp and sawmill. The camp includes a combination bunkhouse, kitchen and dining hall, timekeepers office, carpenter shop, blacksmith and sawfiler shop, stable and tack room, and an engine barn for the Shay logging railroad engine. The camp is laid out along the railroad track leading from the engine barn. These buildings are all constructed of rough lumber in the manner of the original buildings put up for a logging camp, even to the boardwalk between buildings to keep men and supplies out of the mud and the mud out of the kitchen. All of the buildings are functional and the visitor can see them in operation. The museum has acquired a 1903 Barnhart Log Loader from the Penn York Lumberman's Club. It has been restored for use at the camp and sawmill.

Location
Susquehannock State Forest is located in the north central region of Pennsylvania approximately 20 miles south of the New York state line in Potter County.

Climate
Pennsylvania generally has a moist climate with cold winters and warm summers. The Susquehannock State Forest area has cold winter months with temperatures averaging around 22 degrees Fahrenheit (-6 degrees Celsius). The area's average summer temperatures range around 68 degrees Fahrenheit (20 Celsius). Precautions should be made when traveling this snowy area in the winter.

Address
District Forester
P.O. Box 673
Coudersport, PA 16915

Phone: 814-274-8474

Fax: 814-274-7459

  • Susquehannock State Forest Travel Q&A

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