Saskatchewan, Canada Photo Gallery

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Completed in 1856, Holy Trinity Anglican Church at Stanley Mission is the oldest building in Saskatchewan. The church is accessible only by water via a short canoe or motorboat ride from the hamlet of Stanley Mission. Nearby rock paintings are a reminder that the area was home to an indigenous people long before Europeans arrived.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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Reachable only by boat, Nistowiak Falls in Lac La Ronge Provincial Park is the highest waterfall in Saskatchewan. The closest access point is Stanley Mission Indian Reservation; from there it's a 20-kilometer boat ride on the Churchill River to the falls.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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Otter Lake and the village of Missinipe lie at the edge of Saskatchewan's vast northern region. This area is home to numerous lakes, rivers, and boreal forests; and some of the best hunting and fishing in the region.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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During spring, summer, and fall, floatplane and canoe are the only ways to travel into Saskatchewan's uninhabited northern wilderness.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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The Broadway Bridge in Saskatoon is one of seven bridges spanning the South Saskatchewan River as it runs through the city. The river is popular for canoeing and boating, and the riverfront trail is enjoyed by joggers, walkers, and bicyclists.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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The mighty Churchill River—1,000 miles long and threading the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba—is a mecca for canoeing, kayaking, and fishing. A variety of rapids ranging from easy to difficult attract water enthusiasts who come to test these pristine waters.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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With its brightly-colored fences and markers, the cemetery behind historic Holy Trinity Anglican Church at Stanley Mission offers a poignant memorial to the hundreds of people laid to rest in this remote place.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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Floatplanes are regularly used to transport canoe expeditions deep into the backcountry. After being dropped off at remote lakes, parties spend days or weeks leisurely paddling their way back to civilization, camping along shorelines and experiencing a side of Saskatchewan that few people see.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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Batoche National Historic Site was the grounds of the Battle of Batoche fought by a group of Métis and First Nations people against the provincial government. Today the land depicts the culture of the Métis of Batoche between 1860 and 1900.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
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The Churchill River area around Missinipe contains virtually endless possibilities for canoeing, fishing, and exploring. Canoes, equipment, and floatplane services are readily available for rent or charter from locally-owned companies.  
Credit: Eric Lindberg 
 
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