X
The waterfront of Apia stretches from the historic Aggie Grey's Hotel to the government building.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
The Papaseea Sliding Rocks outside Apia make a great, easily accessible place for an afternoon swim. Park by the sign and walk down the trail to the water.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
In September 2009, a tsunami hit the south coast of Upolo, killing nearly 130 people. Reconstruction efforts are ongoing, like these bundles of thatch for the nearly completed Taufua Beach Fales, the owners of which lost 14 family members to the waves.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
Sunset from the beach bar at Le Lagoto Resort, which offers some of the most comfortable and centrally located accommodations on the rugged, underdeveloped island of Savai'i.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
Sea Api, a.k.a. "Da World Famous Craterman," single-handedly built the road/hiking trail from Savai'i's main road to the crater on Mt. Matavanu. He continues to maintain the track and asks 20 tala per person from visitors on their way to the crater.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
Mt. Matavanu last erupted from 1905 to 1911. In the last century, the crater has become overgrown with rainforest, but much of Savai'i remains blanketed by barren lava fields.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
The Taga Blowholes are a unique natural wonder where the lava field meets the sea. Waves force sea water through holes in the lava sheet, creating water spouts that can spray 200 feet in the air.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
Afu Aau Falls on Savai'i features a tier of gently cascading pools that spills from the dense tropical jungle. Just above these falls, a perfectly round, deep pool offers great cliff-diving around its edges.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
Even today, many Samoans still sleep in traditional, open-air beach fales that provide cool ocean breezes during hot Samoan nights. Rustic beach fales like these are also available to tourists looking for inexpensive lodgings with spectacular sea views.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
X
A 15-minute boat ride from western Upolu, tiny Manono Island has only 450 residents, and no cars—or even bicycles—are allowed on the narrow trails that ring the island.  
Credit: Travis Marshall 
 
  • Regional Galleries
  • Related Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement

Compare Rates to Apia


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement