Ngala Private Game Reserve Photo Gallery

X
When choosing a spot for your first safari, how do you even begin? If it's fantastic wildlife and world-class accommodation you seek, Ngala Private Game Reserve will deliver. Housed within South Africa's Kruger National Park, Ngala was the first private game reserve to be incorporated into the famed park.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
With unique yet totally different accommodations, Ngala (meaning 'lion' in one of the local languages) has two options from which to choose: your own villa at Beyond Ngala Safari Lodge or a luxury tent at Beyond Ngala Tented Camp.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Your safari may even begin before you arrive at the lodge. Without a doubt, you'll spot animals on your drive there, such as this family of grazing rhino.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Once you're settled, you'll go on two safaris a day, an early morning ride before the sun rises and a late-afternoon outing that carries over into the night, giving you ample chance to see the park during various stages of the day. Watch out for roadblocks!  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
While cruising around, be sure and let your gaze scan the trees. You never know what sort of primates or birds, like this vulture, may be hanging out there.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Curious creatures, giraffes will also likely peer through the greenery of the treetops to survey the outsiders (i.e., you).  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Some mornings, you'll chance upon a family of hyenas, the cubs tumbling over one another and the parents preparing to hunt for breakfast.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
It's not rare to come face-to-face with the 'king of the jungle'; lions are abundant in these parts.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Oftentimes, if you spy a male lion on his own, you know his pride is lounging lazily nearby.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Don't be alarmed when your guide drives you within an arm's reach of a lion: He's just as curious about you as you are about him.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Another member of the cat family, the cheetah is one of the more elusive creatures of Ngala. Generally, she only roams free at night when it's hard for the human eye to see.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
If you're really lucky, though, you might get to see her and her cubs keeping the African sun at bay while seeking solace in the shade during the height of the day's heat.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
Why does a zebra have stripes? They serve as a camouflage from predators—namely, the lion—and help them blend into the scenery. A zebra's pattern of stripes is just like a fingerprint: No two are the same.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
The final of the Big Five—the five animals most difficult to track on foot, which also includes the lion, giraffe, elephant, and rhino—cape buffalo travel the countryside in herds by the hundreds.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
X
There's a good chance you might spot an animal skull or rotting carcass—or even witness a kill in action. Don't fret: Hakuna matata. It's all a part of the circle of life.  
Credit: Kristin Luna 
 
  • Related Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement