Thru-Hiker's Guide to America

Cohos Trail Points of Interest
By E. Schlimmer
  |  Gorp.com

Excerpted from Thru Hiker's Guide to America by E. Schlimmer

GETTING HIGH
At 4,780 feet, Mount Eisenhower (the highest point on the Cohos Trail) gives hikers a view of the surrounding ranges stretching in endless folds toward the horizon. Because the summit supports fragile and rare alpine vegetation, please do not step on plants—or soil! Step on bare rock or trail only.

BIRD'S-EYE VIEW
Located near the town of Jefferson, the Pondicherry Wildlife Reserve is home to more than sixty species of birds. Black-capped chickadees, boreal chickadees, Canada jays, hermit thrush, and wood thrush are just a few of the winged creatures that are attracted to the shallow waters of Cherry Pond. Hikers, too, love the view across Cherry Pond to Mount Washington. On my 2003 thru-hike, I spotted three moose in the area, and you have a good chance to see ’em, too.

HIGH POINT OF THE FAR NORTH
Of New Hampshire’s forty-eight peaks that exceed 4,000 feet, Mount Cabot (4,170 feet) is the only one to offer free, improved accommodations above the 4,000-foot level. The Cabot Cabin, a green and white wooden structure near the summit, is the former fire warden’s cabin. It has bunk room for eight, a porch, and a fine view; best of all, it’s free. In the past this cabin has been trashed. Pack out all your garbage and leave the cabin in better condition than you find it, please.

THAT FIRST STEP IS A DOOZY
Located in the north, Table Rock—a ledge above Dixville Notch—offers a great view. Perched seven hundred vertical feet above Route 26, this is not a place for the faint of heart.

PERCY PEAKS
The CT symbol is modeled after these two distinct mountains located in the Nash Stream area. North Percy (3,400 feet) offers a 360-degree view; South Percy (3,234 feet) has expansive views to the west and northwest.

THIS LAND IS OUR LAND
Nash Stream Forest, which was owned by a paper company but was recently acquired by the state of New Hampshire, is unruly and rugged. Besides hiking trails, only a few dirt roads penetrate the area.

WE'RE NOT IN KANSAS ANYMORE
The far-north section of the state (near the town of Pittsburg) is so remote it sees only the local old codger out hunting, or people who enjoy bushwhacking heinous, trailless, viewless 3,000-foot peaks all day. You know, weirdos.


Article © McGraw-Hill. All rights reserved.


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