Olympic National Forest

Biking
Gorp.com

Mountain bike opportunities on the Quilcene Ranger District vary from steep climbing trails to narrow gravel roads. By combining the trails and roads the bicyclist can create loops that offer a variety of settings, including forests, stream sides and panoramic vistas.

The following routes are recommended for mountain bicyclists. These routes are generally open spring, summer and fall. Use caution when traveling on Forest Service roads. Trails listed below are open to hikers, horses and ORVs, so please watch for other users. If you plan to camp, please use existing camp spots and boil all water. Many other routes could be developed by studying a district map and planning your own trip.

Several of the Forest's trails provide access to Olympic National Park. When planning your trip remember that regulations will vary between the National Forest and National Park. Many of the trails provide access to the six wildernesses on the Olympic Peninsula (one in the Park and five in the Forest). Wilderness trails are closed to all motor vehicles and mountain bicycles.

Lower Big Quilcene Trail #833
The entire 6.2 miles of trail passes through typical northwest forest along the Big Quilcene River. Grade is 10-15 percent. The trail/road loop can be made by traveling up the trail from the 2700-080 to the 2750 to the 27 and back to the 2700-080. Road 27 is paved and affords wonderful views of the Olympic Mountains. The total trail/road loop is about 18 miles in length. Camp at Bark Shanty, Camp Jolley and Ten Mile Shelter.

Location: Drive one mile south of Quilcene on US Hwy. 101 to Penny Creek Rd. on the right. Follow Penny Creek Rd. to Forest Service Rd. 27 and continue 1.5 miles to the intersection with Forest Service Rd. 2700-080 on the left. To reach the upper access of this trail follow Forest Service Rd. 27 another 7 miles to Forest Service Rd. 7250. Follow 2750 for 5 miles to the upper trailhead of Lower Big Quilcene Trail.

Lower Dungeness Trail #833
The 6-mile trail not only passes through typical northwest forest along the Dungeness River, but also climbs over the lower portion of Three O'Clock Ridge. Mossy rock outcrops and steep side slopes are found in the ridge area. To make the trail/road loop, travel up the trail to the Lower Dungeness Trailhead and follow the 2860 Rd. back down to the Lower Dungeness Trailhead. Spectacular views can be seen from the 2860 road. The trail/road loop covers about 18 miles.

Location: Drive US Hwy. 101 to Palo Alto Rd. 2 miles north of Sequim Bay State Park. Take Palo Alto Rd., which becomes Forest Service Rd. 28 at the Forest Boundary, and proceed to 28 to the junction with Rd. 2860. Turn onto 2860 and continue for about 3.5 miles to the Lower Dungeness Trail.

Gold Creek Trail #830
This 6.4-mile trail is heavily wooded with few viewpoints. To make a trial/road loop, travel up the Gold Creek Trail to Rd. 2860. Follow Rd. 2860 back to trailhead. Or, travel up the Gold Creek Trail to Rd. 2860, follow 2860 4 miles back to the Upper Big Quilcene Trailhead, head south on the Lower Dungeness Trail back to Rd. 2860 and continue 0.5 miles to the Gold Creek Trailhead. The trail/road loop covers about 17 miles.

Location: Drive US Hwy. 101 to Palo Alto Rd. 2 miles north of Sequim Bay State Park. Take Palo Alto Rd., which becomes Forest Service Rd. 28 at the Forest Boundary, and proceed on 28 to the junction with Rd. 2860. Turn onto 2860 and continue for about 3 miles to the Gold Creek Trailhead.

Mt. Zion Trail #836
Excellent views of Puget Sound, Mt. Baker, Mt. Rainier and the Cascades at the summit. This 1.8 mile trail travels through forested second growth fir and cedar, spring blooming rhododendrons, Oregon grape, salal and ferns. Water is scarce. Grade is 15-20 percent.

Location: Mt. Zion Trail #836 starts 13 miles northwest of Quilcene on Forest Service Rd. 2810. Take the Lord's Lake Loop Rd., 2 miles north of Quilcene on US Hwy. 101. Follow Lord's Lake Loop to the lake and turn left. Continue on Forest service Rd. 28 to the intersection with Forest Service Rd. 2810 at Bon Jon Pass. Follow Rd. 2810 for 2 miles to the trailhead parking area. The trail is steep and has several water diversion structures that make it difficult for mountain bikes.


Published: 29 Apr 2002 | Last Updated: 15 Sep 2010
Details mentioned in this article were accurate at the time of publication

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