Lone Star Memories

Guadalupe River
  |  Gorp.com

The Guadalupe River is the stream where I first paddled a canoe and cast a fly-rod. We stayed at a homey little place called Koehler Kottages, right along the river outside Kerrville. When we weren't saddled up for a trail ride, we were either on or in the Guadalupe. It was a slow stream, no problem for a ten-year-old to paddle up or float down. I don't remember catching any of the famous Guadalupe bass, the state fish of Texas, but I do recollect many long lazy summer afternoons.

The Guadalupe River is the stream where I first paddled a canoe and cast a fly-rod. We stayed at a homey little place called Koehler Kottages, right along the river outside Kerrville. When we weren't saddled up for a trail ride, we were either on or in the Guadalupe. It was a slow stream, no problem for a ten-year-old to paddle up or float down. I don't remember catching any of the famous Guadalupe bass, the state fish of Texas, but I do recollect many long lazy summer afternoons.

Guadalupe State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area protect a stretch of the Guadalupe downstream from where we vacationed. Combined, the park and natural area cover about 4,200 acres of Texas hill country. Huge bald cypress line the banks of the river, and as it winds for four miles through the park the stream plunges over four natural rapids, carved through limestone bluffs.

Birdwatchers head for a woodland of virgin Ashe juniper and oak- where the endangered golden-cheeked warbler nests. April to June is the best time for spotting the warbler. Along Honey Creek in the natural area, visitors will find a variety of unusual species: Cagle's map turtle, guadalupe bass, four-lined skink, green kingfisher and the Honey Creek Cave salamander. Wildlife enthusiasts also find the variety of animals typical of the hill country, from white-tailed deer to coyote and armadillo.

Canoers, tubers and swimmers will find the river enticing. Hikers can walk about three miles of trails in the park. Honey Creek, with another couple of mile of trails, can be visited by guided tour only. Campers have separate sections for RV, tent and walk-in sites, with drinking water and sanitary facilities.

Directions: From San Antonio, the distance is about 30 miles. Take US Highway 281 north, then head west on State Highway 46 for 8 miles to Park Road 31 north.


Published: 29 Apr 2002 | Last Updated: 11 May 2011
Details mentioned in this article were accurate at the time of publication

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