Everglades National Park

Hiking - Long Pine & Shark Area Trails
Gorp.com

More than 28 miles (45 km) of connecting trails wind through the pine forest around Long Pine Key Campground. The Long Pine Key Nature Trail is a continuous trail which runs 7 miles (11 km) west from the campground to to Pine Glades Lake along the main park road. It is open to bicycles. The Old Ingraham Highway is also open to bicycles. It runs 11 miles (18 km) south and west from near the Royal Palm Visitor Center, and with two overnight campsites along the way.

Here are some other segments. . .

Anhinga Trail - 0.5 miles (800 meters) round trip. At the Royal Palm Visitor Center, four miles (6 km) from the main park entrance. This self-guiding trail winds through a sawgrass marsh, where you may see alligators, turtles, anhingas, herons, egrets, and many other birds, especially during the winter. This is one of the most popular trails in the park because of its abundance of wildlife. Wheelchair accessible.

Gumbo-Limbo Trail - 0.5 miles (800 meters) round trip. At the Royal Palm Visitor Center, four miles (6 km) from the main park entrance. This self-guiding, paved trail meanders through a shaded, jungle-like hammock of gumbo limbo trees (Bursera simaruba), royal palms (Roystonea elata), ferns, and air plants. Wheelchair accessible.

Pineland Trail - 0.5 miles (800 meters) round trip. Seven miles (11 km) from the main park entrance. This trail loops through a forest of pines, palmettos, and wildflowers. Accessible, though narrow and uneven in places where roots have pushed the pavement up.

Pahayokee Overlook - 0.25 miles (400 meters) round trip. Thirteen miles (21 km) from the main park entrance. A raised observation platform on this boardwalk loop provides sweeping vistas of the"river of grass." Wheelchair accessible.

Mahogany Hammock Trail - 0.5 miles (400 meters) round trip. Twenty miles (32 km) from the main park entrance. This self-guiding boardwalk trail meanders through a dense, jungle-like hardwood "hammock." Lush vegetation includes gumbo-limbo trees, air plants, and the largest living mahogany tree (Swietenia mahogani) in the United States. Wheelchair accessible.

Shark Valley

Bobcat Boardwalk - 0.5 miles (400 meters). Behind the Shark Valley Visitor Center. This self-guiding boardwalk trail meanders through the sawgrass slough and tropical hardwood forests. Wheelchair accessible.

Otter Cave Hammock Trail - 0.25 miles (200 meters). At Shark Valley, 0.5 miles (400 meters) walk from the Shark Valley Visitor Center on the tram road. A rough, limestone trail through a lush, tropical hardwood forest. Often flooded during the summer; check at the Visitor Center for current conditions.

Tram Road - 15 miles (24 km) round trip. This flat, paved road is used for tram rides, bicycling, and walking. Along the road you may see alligators, herons, egrets, deer, turtles, and snail kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus). An observation tower at the half-way point provides panoramic views. Bicycles may be rented from the Shark Valley Tram Tour company. Bicycling the tram road is an excellent way to see the Everglades.


Published: 29 Apr 2002 | Last Updated: 15 Sep 2010
Details mentioned in this article were accurate at the time of publication

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