Lone Star Memories

Devil's River
  |  Gorp.com

One summer we borrowed a pickup and drove many backcountry miles to a fishing camp along the Devil's River. The river was wide and slow-moving upstream from where it hits the Rio Grande near the border town of Del Rio. Jumping in, the water offered a cool blast and washed away dust and sweat that clung to us from our drive. At one spot, the river cascaded over a series of short falls. We dropped minnows from long cane poles into the pools below the falls and hauled in bass hour after hour.Today, the Devil's River State Natural Area preserves a 20,000-acre stretch along the Devil's River. The river flows freely from a series of springs through wide shallow areas, occasionally building into long deep pools or narrowing to turbulent rapids. The surrounding landscape joins the Edwards Plateau of the Hill Country from the east with Trans-Pecos west Texas. Dense groves of live oak and pecan stand along the river. Sharp eyes may spot birdlife from wild turkey to cactus wren or elf owl. Snakes and lizards are abundant, and in the river live the endangered Devil's River minnow and Conchos pupfish.

Visitors to the park can enjoy remote desert hiking and mountain biking along a 12-mile loop, or put in for canoeing down the river. Archaeological sites can be visited by permit. Primitive campsites are available, as well as a group conference area, but expect facilities to be limited and bring your own water. And during the summer plan for temperatures around Devil's River to approach 100 degrees.

Directions: From Del Rio, head north on State highway 277, for 45 miles. Turn left on Dolan Creek Road and go 19 miles to the park boundary. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED for Devil's River SNA. Call 512-389-8900.

One summer we borrowed a pickup and drove many backcountry miles to a fishing camp along the Devil's River. The river was wide and slow-moving upstream from where it hits the Rio Grande near the border town of Del Rio. Jumping in, the water offered a cool blast and washed away dust and sweat that clung to us from our drive. At one spot, the river cascaded over a series of short falls. We dropped minnows from long cane poles into the pools below the falls and hauled in bass hour after hour.Today, the Devil's River State Natural Area preserves a 20,000-acre stretch along the Devil's River. The river flows freely from a series of springs through wide shallow areas, occasionally building into long deep pools or narrowing to turbulent rapids. The surrounding landscape joins the Edwards Plateau of the Hill Country from the east with Trans-Pecos west Texas. Dense groves of live oak and pecan stand along the river. Sharp eyes may spot birdlife from wild turkey to cactus wren or elf owl. Snakes and lizards are abundant, and in the river live the endangered Devil's River minnow and Conchos pupfish.

Visitors to the park can enjoy remote desert hiking and mountain biking along a 12-mile loop, or put in for canoeing down the river. Archaeological sites can be visited by permit. Primitive campsites are available, as well as a group conference area, but expect facilities to be limited and bring your own water. And during the summer plan for temperatures around Devil's River to approach 100 degrees.

Directions: From Del Rio, head north on State highway 277, for 45 miles. Turn left on Dolan Creek Road and go 19 miles to the park boundary. RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED for Devil's River SNA. Call 512-389-8900.


Published: 29 Apr 2002 | Last Updated: 11 May 2011
Details mentioned in this article were accurate at the time of publication

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