Wind Cave National Park Photo Gallery

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Wind Cave National Park is one of the world's largest and most complex cave systems. Its many 'rooms' are named, often referring to people involved with the park, physical aspects of the room, or something popular at the time of its discovery. The Club Room, shown here, was named for its club shape—narrow at one end and broad at the other.  
Credit: Jason Walz/National Park Service 
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Coyotes are one of several Wind Cave predators. Bobcats, cougars, and badgers also inhabit the park, but coyotes are the most spotted by visitors--not in the cave, mind you, but across its 28,295 acres of mixed-grass prairie and ponderosa pine forest  
Credit: National Park Service 
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Elk are some of the most visible animals in the park. There is even a campground named after them—Elk Mountain Campground—where visitors are likely to spy them grazing in nearby fields.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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The park resides in South Dakota's Black Hills, a rugged landscape surrounded by more placid prairie, which stands in stark relief against the more foreboding rock features.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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At least 30 miles of hiking trails traverse the park, easily one of the best ways to explore Wind Cave outside of its subterranean namesake. The individual routes range from one to six miles long.  
Credit: Charlie Baker/National Park Service 
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Built from concrete and steel in 1929, the Beaver Creek Bridge was constructed to look as if the arches rose naturally from the rock walls of its supporting canyon.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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Skyway Lake, one of the many Wind Cave rooms, was named for its pool of water and flowstone.  
Credit: Jason Walz/National Park Service 
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The view from Rankin Ridge, one of three-mile-long nature trail loops in Wind Cave.  
Credit: National Park Service 
 
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