Point Reyes National Seashore Photo Gallery

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California's Point Reyes National Seashore sits just north of San Francisco, its headlands jutting 20 miles out into the Pacific. Abbotts Lagoon, pictured here, remains one of the locale's most popular spot for birding, especially during autumn and winter. Hawks, waterfowl, osprey, and other shorebirds are often spotted in the area.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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Wild douglas iris blankets punctuate the coastal landscape throughout Point Reyes.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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Parts of the inland Inverness Ridge, the area of forested peaks running along the northwest-southeast spine of the seashore, were burned in a 1995 forest fire, and the scars are still visible today.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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Spanish explorer Sebastian Vizcaino gave the peninsula its original name, Punto de los Reyes (King's Point), when his ship, the Capitana, anchored in Drake's Bay on January 6, 1603—the Day of the Three Kings.  
Credit: Punto de los Reyes, Sebastian Vizcaino, Point Reyes National Seashore, California 
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Although birders proclaim the park is tailored for spotting avian species over surfing, groms can still catch waves in several locations around the peninsula, especially the southern beaches.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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The Tule Elk Reserve located on Tomales Point offers a great wildlife viewing opportunities. Along with herds of elk, deer, seals, whales, and more call this ethereal spot home.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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The Point Reyes National Seashore covers 70,000 acres of land, nearly geologically separated from the continental U.S. by a rift zone of the San Andreas Fault, which rests below sea level.  
Credit: Wikimedia Commons 
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The peninsula contains a diverse mix of terrain, including wild coastal beaches and headlands, estuaries, and forested uplands.  
Credit: Timothy Hearsum/Getty 
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McClure's Beach is a beautiful but dangerous spot, with big craggy rocks and intense surf. If you venture in, do so at low tide.  
Credit: Willard Clay/Photographers Choice/Getty 
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If any place warrants a lighthouse it's Point Reyes—the windiest place on the Pacific and second foggiest spot on the entire North American continent. The aptly-named Point Reyes Lighthouse was constructed and manned in 1870, then retired from service in 1975 when the U.S. Coast Guard installed an automated light.  
Credit: Corel 
 
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