Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge Photo Gallery

X
Stand just about anywhere on Oregon's coast and you'll see rocks jutting out from the roiling waters of the northern Pacific Ocean. And every one of them—including Tillamook Head (pictured)—is collectively protected under the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
The refuge counts 1,853 sea stacks, reefs, and islands and two headland areas and spans 320 miles of the state's coastline. Of that vast terrain, only Coquille Point (pictured) is open to the public.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
Also protected within the refuge are 13 species of nesting seabirds, including common murres (pictured here, on Colony Rock), tufted puffins, Leach's and fork-tailed storm-petrels, rhinoceros auklets, brandts, pelagic and double-crested cormorants, and pigeon guillemots.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
Harbor seals, California sea lions, Steller sea lions (pictured here, on the Rogue Reef), and northern elephant seals also use the rocks and islands as a refuge from the ocean.  
Credit: David B. Ledig/USFWS 
X
The refuge also hosts plenty of predatory animals, like this bald eagle swooping down on a colony of common murres at Colony Rock.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
Starfish clinging to the rocks of Oregon's Pacific coastline.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
The instantly recognizable outline of Haystack Rock, on Cannon Beach, as seen from Highway 101.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
X
Kelp beds at Crook Point, a major contributor to the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge food chain.  
Credit: David B. Ledig/USFWS 
X
The sheltered and sun-dappled offshore rocks at Crook Point are a magnet for seabirds.  
Credit: Roy W. Lowe/USFWS 
 
  • Regional Galleries
  • Most Recent Galleries
Replay Slideshow
 
txt

advertisement


Post Your Comment

You have characters left.

advertisement