Olympic National Park Photo Gallery

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Renowned for its diverse landscapes, Olympic National Park also boasts unique biological diversity. Isolated for eons by glacial ice, and later the waters of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the peninsula over which the park sprawls is home to plants and animals that are found nowhere else on Earth.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Explore the lower 48's largest section of wilderness coast—more than 60 miles of cliffs, headlands, islands, and seastacks. Olympic National Park's Rialto and Kalaloch beaches have road access, but most of the coast can be reached only on foot. Once there, find a scenic campsite right on the beach.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Ninety-five percent of Olympic National Park is designated wilderness, which helps protect plants such as the skunk cabbage. This early bloomer lets everyone know that spring is knocking. Just don't substitute this in your coleslaw recipe—it's poisonous.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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The largest remaining undisturbed old-growth and temperate rainforests in the Northwest are found in Olympic National Park. More than 600 miles of trails provide access to these wild areas, with everything from easy riverside strolls to tough ridgeline treks.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Mount Storm King, the 4,534-foot peak keeping watch over the east end of Lake Crescent, is the site of a Forest Service experiment that worked too well. Four mountain goats were released on the mountain in 1925; the herd quickly grew to 800 and had a lasting environmental impact.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Swaying underwater glades of kelp are the unseen forests of Olympic's coastline, offering shelter to sea creatures such as fish and sea otters. When pieces are washed ashore, admire but don't touch the protected marvels.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Want to visit Olympic National Park in the winter? Hurricane Ridge, one of only two ski areas located in a national park, offers two cross-country ski and snowshoe trails, a downhill area, a snow play area, and some challenging ungroomed glades and bowls.  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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Lake Crescent was dug by huge continental ice sheets that poured out of Canada more than 13,000 years ago. Hike to the many waterfalls that tumble into the lake, or wet your hook for trout from its shore (catch and release only).  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
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'If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it.' – Lyndon B. Johnson, upon signing the Wilderness Act in 1964  
Credit: Gordon Hempton 
 
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