Glacier National Park Photo Gallery

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Shaped by the advance and retreat of glaciers over tens of thousands of years, the jagged mountain peaks, crystaline lakes, and verdant meadows and valleys of Montana's Glacier National Park are truly awe inspiring. Though the park's glaciers have grown and shrunk throughout their extensive geologic history, in recent years, warmer global temperatures have led to a steady glacial retreat. Of the 150 glaciers in the park when it was first surveyed in the 19th century, only 25 remain today. And scientists believe that if current climate trends continue, all of the park's glaciers will have disappeared by 2030.  
Credit: David Zuckerman 
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One of the most spectacular drives in North America, Glacier's Going-to-the-Sun Road winds its way across the entire 53-mile width of the park. A feat of engineering completed in 1932, the road passes many of Glacier's most popular landmarks and crosses the Continental Divide at Logan Pass.  
Credit: C.G.P Grey/Flickr 
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Glacier encompasses more than 1 million acres, within which are parts of two mountain ranges (known to the Blackfeet as 'the Backbone of the World'), more than a thousand species of plants and animals, and 700 lakes, only 130 of which are named.  
Credit: Rick McCharles/Flickr 
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Glacier's second-largest lake, Saint Mary Lake runs 9.9 miles from the park's eastern entrance, with Going-to-the-Sun Road charting a parallel course alongside.  
Credit: Mike Boehmer/Flickr 
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Coupled with adjacent protected lands, Glacier's massive size provides a vast habitat for animal species of all kinds, most notably the majestic mammals that need all that space. The park is home to 62 mammal species including mountain goats—the park's official symbol—black and grizzly bears, elk, bighorn sheep, wolverines, lynx, cougars, and endangered gray wolves.  
Credit: schmeeve/Flickr 
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Bighorn sheep are a common site throughout the park, especially on Going-to-the-Sun Road.  
Credit: Jessica Merz/Flickr 
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Lake McDonald is Glacier's largest and deepest lake, running 10 miles in length and reaching 472 feet at its deepest point.  
Credit: Bill Kuschel/Flickr 
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Bears, including black bears and grizzlies, abound in Glacier and are often seen, like this black bear cub, dining on huckleberries.  
Credit: schmeeve/Flickr 
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Many Glacier Hotel backed by Swiftcurrent Lake and Mount Gould. Many Glacier was one of several chalet- and lodge-style hotels built in Glacier between 1910 and 1913. The rush of construction was part of an effort by railroad magnate Louis Hill to establish Glacier as a destination resort similar to the Swiss Alps, hence the hotels' Swiss chalet architectural style.  
Credit: ann-dabney/Flickr 
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A peaceful dawn at Glacier's Fishercap Lake  
Credit: Lee Coursey/Flickr 
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Many of the park's glacial-fed waters are colored a stunning turquoise due to suspended glacial silt.  
Credit: Dave Sizer/Flickr 
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Colorful rocks in Lake McDonald. The year-round chilly temperatures in Glacier's lakes limit the growth of plankton, which results in remarkably clear water.  
Credit: David Zuckerman 
 
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