Glacier Bay National Park Photo Gallery

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It's not easy to get there but, once you do, you'll find that a visit to Glacier Bay National Park is worth the effort. Approximately 60 miles west of the state capital of Juneau, the World Heritage Site boasts more than a million acres of breathtaking scenery, including snow-capped mountain ranges, coastal beaches, freshwater lakes, and tidewater glaciers. Marine life, land mammals, and seabirds offer plenty of reasons to break out the binoculars.  
Credit: Melinda Webster/National Park Service 
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No roads lead to Glacier Bay National Park but airlines connect to Gustavus, the park's closest neighboring town, as well as from Juneau, Haines, and Skagway. Sightseers can also take a ferry service from Juneau, hop one of the cruise ships that make frequent day trips into the park, or charter a plane. Once you've made it as far as Gustavus, it's another ten miles by road to Bartlett Cove, the area of the bay where you'll find the park's headquarters.  
Credit: Fritz Koschmann/National Park Service 
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Glaciers seen today in Glacier Bay are remnants of the Little Ice Age, which began 4,000 years ago. Many visitors come to the park to catch sight of a tidewater glacier—the type that break off and fall dramatically into the water. Margerie (pictured here) and Lamplugh Glaciers draw many visitors. Tour boats are a great way to view glaciers and many have naturalists on board to add information and insight to the experience.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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A mere 200 years ago, a 100-mile-long glacier protruded into Bartlett Cove. Icebergs no longer exist in this area, but they’re responsible for the many other activities on hand, including the Forest Loop Trail, an easy, mile-long route through a spruce and hemlock forest and down to a beach. Or take on one of the longer hikes where you're more likely to catch glimpse of some wildlife. Backpacking in the park is a rewarding experience for those who are willing and feel comfortable to explore the park backcountry. Though Bartlett Cove has four maintained day-hike trails, the rest of the park is a glorious blank slate of wilderness and beach.  
Credit: T. Rains/National Park Service 
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Marine mammals abound in Glacier Bay National Park. Minke and orka whales feed near the shore alongside porpoises; sea lions lounge on rocky islands; and harbor seals breed and nurture pups on floating ice. Join one of the many whale watching trips by chartered boat or a group kayaking trip.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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Ice caves, like this one, offer an illustrative juxtaposition of the various topographies that make Glacier Bay one of the National Park Service's most prized locales.  
Credit: J. Driscoll/National Park Service 
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Land animals in Alaska's wilderness forage for food near the water's edge, nibbling on clams or barnacles or chasing larger forms of life. Moose and bears can swim, whereas wolves and coyotes stick to the grassy areas near the beach, and marmots and mountain goats stand by the water and lick the salt spray off of rocks.  
Credit: Melinda Webster/National Park Service 
 
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