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The snowcapped, snaggle-toothed Grand Tetons are America's quintessential mountain range, rearing up with cartoonish exaggeration out of the sagebrush-covered flats of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Topped by 13,770-foot Grand Teton, these mountains are magnets for the world's top alpinists—peak baggers, big-wall climbers, and backcountry and free skiers. All of them find the Tetons' extreme terrain an endless canvas on which to invent evermore hair-raising ways to gain and lose elevation.  
Credit: Photodisc/Getty 
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Backpacking Grand Teton National Park's Teton Crest provides a taste of all the flavors the park has to offer. The trail runs north from the park's southern border, through the high country for 39 miles, ending at Paintbrush Canyon. A day or two into the trip you reach Alaska Basin, one of those magical, wildflower-strewn backcountry spots where you can laze for days. You can curtail your hike, walking out magnificent Cascade Canyon, or head for Lake Solitude, over Paintbrush Divide and out Paintbrush Canyon.  
Credit: Sarah Zenner/National Park Service 
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Teton Park Road ranks among the country's best scenic drives. It curves through the park, skirting Jenny and Jackson lakes, with the peaks of the Tetons always in view. Along the way, you'll pass turnouts with glorious views, trailheads for day hikes, and turnoffs for side trips—Signal Mountain Road to the top of Signal Mountain is recommended. Summit overlooks provide a panoramic view of the entire Teton Range, Jackson Lake, and most of Jackson Hole.  
Credit: Purestock 
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For a smooth ride through sagebrush, bike the Antelope Flats area east of Highway 191. You'll cruise through some prime bison-spotting territory as well as pass historic and picturesque Moulton Cabin.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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Cross-country skiing is another mellow way to penetrate Grand Teton National Park. The challenging Flagg Canyon Trail on the north side follows the edge of the scenic Snake River, along riverside meadows before reaching a canyon walled with volcanic rock. On the south side, try the Phelps Lake Overlook Trail, which climbs southward through a lodgepole-pine forest and over an open slope to reach the overlook of Phelps Lake framed by towering Douglas firs.  
Credit: Photodisc/Getty 
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A float trip down the Snake River weaves through the stunning landscape, providing ample opportunity for wildlife viewing, especially on evening trips when animals emerge at dusk to forage. Enjoy the ride as great blue herons glide past and eagles return to their nests in the tall pines. You might even see moose peering out from the forested riverbanks. Choose from half- or full-day scenic floats or go for more advanced Class II to III rides through Snake River Canyon.  
Credit: Charles Ruffin 
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Snow blankets the Grand Tetons with about 175 inches per year, feeding glaciers under threat from climate change. There are currently 12 glaciers in the park including Schoolroom Glacier (pictured here), a small glacier next to the south Cascade Canyon trail.  
Credit: National Park Service 
 
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