Canyon de Chelly National Monument Photo Gallery

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Canyon de Chelly Monument, which spans 131 square miles, became part of the National Park Service in 1931. Tseyi Overlook (shown) means 'inside the rock.' Two paved routes—North and South Rim Drives—at the visitor center lead to sheer red cliffs towering 1,000 feet above the canyon floor.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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Layers of colorful stream-cut rock form the monument's steep cliffs. Access to the canyon floor is restricted, and visitors can only travel in de Chelly and del Muerto canyons in the company of a park ranger or authorized Navajo guide.  
Credit: Geostock/Photodisc 
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There are more than 2,700 archaeological sites within the monument. White House Trail is a six-mile round-trip trek that leads to White House Ruin. Villages built by the Anasazi line the canyon's base.  
Credit: Steve Bly/Digital Vision/Getty 
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Ancient Puebloans and Hopi tribes first farmed this land in the 1300s. The Anasazi stacked clay bricks and timber to secure the walls of their kivas.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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The stories of de Chelly's early inhabitants are illustrated on canyon and cliff walls. Petroglyphs and pictographs depict historical events and symbolize everyday life for the Anasazi.  
Credit: Pete Ryan/National Geographic/Getty 
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More than 100 Navajos were killed in a violent siege at Massacre Cave. Spanish troops opened fire on children, tribe elders, and women who were hiding in the cave's depths.  
Credit: National Park Service 
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Temps in and around the monument are extreme, grazing 100 degrees Fahrenheit in summer and dipping below freezing in winter. Despite the harsh climes, the canyons harbor a variety of plants and flowers, from yucca and cactus to juniper and Mexican pine.  
Credit: Robin Hood/Arizona Office of Tourism 
 
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