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An easy 45-minute drive from the Tasmanian capital of Hobart, Bonorong Wildlife Park offers an amazing glimpse into the diverse wildlife of this southern-island state, like Oz's iconic koala.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Bonorong, Aboriginal for "native companion," isn't a zoo—it's a center dedicated to the safety of the resident animals, many of which were rescued after being orphaned or injured. Whenever possible, the animals released back into the wild after they've recuperated.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Though Bonorong has been around since 1981, it's recently come under the ownership of Greg Irons, an enthusiastic animal-lover shown here holding one of his prized wombats.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The park boasts a healthy population of Tasmanian devils—17 at last count. Originally dubbed Beelzebub's pup by Tasi's early explorers, the devils are the size of a small dog and emit 11 different vocal sounds, including fierce screams, snorts, and barks.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Hearing those sounds in the dead of night, with only the halo of a campfire to keep darkness at bay, it's easy to see how "devil" integrated itself into the early descriptions of the animals—and the name stuck. But in truth the devils are not as fearsome as implied by the satanic allusion.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Unfortunately, that disparaging name has inspired some to consider the animals a pest; they're commonly persecuted throughout Tasmania. The species is also being decimated by Devil Facial Tumour Disease. Bonorong specializes in educating people on the true nature of the devil, and has served as a successful breeding site for over a decade.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The tawny frogmouth can be seen throughout Australia, as well as parts of southern New Guinea. The bird hunts at night, and spends the day roosting on dead logs or tree branches near the trunk with near-perfect camouflage.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Though nocturnal—and despite its similar appearance—the frogmouth are not owls. They typically catch their insect prey not by flying, but by lying in wait.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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Bonorong also has one resident peacock  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
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The koala reside in coastal regions of southern and eastern parts of the country, and despite common perception is classified as a marsupial and not a bear—a fact that escapes most outside of Australia.  
Credit: Nathan Borchelt 
 
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