Alaska's National Wildlife Refuges Photo Gallery

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The vertiginous, snow-covered Brooks Range serves as the spine of the 19.2-million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. More than 45 species call this land home, with three designated wild rivers coursing through its vast landscape.  
Credit: USFWS 
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A ten-day guided canoe trip down the refuge's Canning River is the most popular tour. Hikers, however, should posses serious backcountry and outdoor skills if they plan to backpack this barren landscape.  
Credit: Steve Hellebrand/USFWS 
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Fishing also draws the hearty angler to the refuge, which supports more than 36 species including Dolly Varden char and arctic grayling at places like the Kongakut River (pictured).  
Credit: USFWS 
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In April, the refuge's caribou head north toward the calving grounds on the arctic coastal plains. They return south in mid-July and migrate to the Brooks Range in the fall to endure winter along the south-slope river drainages.  
Credit: USFWS 
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Polar bears congregate along the coast of the refuge in October and November, part of the larger, 1,500-strong Southern Beaufort Sea bear population.  
Credit: Susanne Miller/USFWS 
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In 1941 President Roosevelt set aside 1,730,000 acres for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Today, the refuge covers nearly 1.92 million acres.  
Credit: USFWS 
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The refuge shares 800-square-mile Harding Icefield with Kenai Fjords National Park. The slow geographical withdrawal of this glacier has created a miniature Alaska with a wide variety of different habitats for animals as varied as brown and black bears, caribou, eagles, wolves, Alaska-Yukon moose, and thousands of shorebirds.  
Credit: USFWS 
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The refuge's Chickaloon River Flats is the last pristine major saltwater estuary on the Kenai Peninsula, serving as a staging ground for thousands of shorebirds and waterfowl like this mallard hen.  
Credit: Steve Hillebrand/USFWS 
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Sport fishing draws anglers in the hundreds of thousands each year. The resort boasts chinook; sockeye, coho, and pink salmon; Dolly Varden char; rainbow trout; and arctic grayling.  
Credit: USFWS 
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Of course fishing isn't isolated to merely Arctic and Kenai national wildlife refuges. Here a proud angler displays his chinnok salmon in Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge.  
Credit: Kra Krumenauer/USFWS 
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Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge straddles the Arctic Circle, about 150 miles northwest of Fairbanks. The 1.637-million-acre refuge offers a prime example of the state’s boreal ecosystem, dominated by black and white spruce with short, hot summers and a robust animal population.  
Credit: Bill Raften/USFWS 
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Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1941, providing a habitat for brown bear, salmon, and other wildlife. The 1.9-million-acre sanctuary is largely dominated by 4,000-foot-tall mountains, lakes, marshes, bogs, meadows, and hundreds of miles of coastline.  
Credit: Steve Hillebrand/USFWS 
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Innoko National Wildlife Refuge, which covers 3,850,000 acres of west-central Alaska, cannot be accessed by car or boat; only seaplanes are recommended to explore the refuge.  
Credit: USFWS 
 
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