What to do in Mt Pisgah State Park

The land that was to become Mt. Pisgah State Park was first cleared for farmland in the early 1800's. Many of the early settlers came from New England, and their descendants still reside in the area. These hearty pioneers cleared the virgin pine and hardwood and stacked the stumps in fence rows, which still border the old fields.

The land for Mt. Pisgah State Park was obtained in 1969 with funds from Project 70, a state bond issue. The Stephen Foster Dam was completed in 1977 and public facilities were dedicated in 1979.

Mt. Pisgah State Park offers a wide range of activities centered around Stephen Foster Lake. Picnicking opportunities with nearby showers, swimming pool and nature center offer a fun-filled afternoon. The park environmental interpretive center houses artifacts and displays linking us with our past. Visitors can enjoy guided nature walks, night hikes and slide programs on various environmental topics, including bears, snakes and owls. Hunting, trapping and the training of dogs is permitted on 1,100 acres of park property. Deer, turkey, grouse, squirrel, rabbit, and pheasant can be found in the park and on the adjacent State Game Land 289.

The land which was to become Mt. Pisgah State Park was first cleared for farmland in the early 1800's. Many of the early settlers came from New England, and their descendants still reside in the area. These hearty pioneers cleared the virgin pine and hardwood and stacked the stumps in fencerows, which still border the old fields.

The land for Mt. Pisgah State Park was obtained in 1969 with funds from Project 70, a state bond issue. Development of facilities were financed through Project 500, another state bond issue and a grant from the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. The Stephen Foster Dam was completed in 1977 and public facilities were dedicated in 1979.

Recreation
Mt. Pisgah State Park offers a wide range of activities centered around Stephen Foster Lake. Picnicking opportunities with nearby showers, swimming pool and nature center offer a fun-filled afternoon.

The park environmental interpretive center houses artifacts and displays linking us with our past. You can learn about early farm life and the wildlife around us. The park offers a variety of interpretive programs for the general public. Visitors can enjoy guided nature walks, night hikes and slide programs on various environmental topics, including bears, snakes and owls. During the summer months, youth ages 4 to 13 are invited to participate in day camps, including Touch and Grow, Environmental Discovery and Junior Naturalist. In the spring and fall, programming shifts from interpretation for the general public to environmental education for school groups. The park now serves as an outdoor classroom for area schools. Students participate in hands-on environmental education activities to further their awareness and understanding of the natural world. Reservations must be made in advance.

Hunting, trapping and the training of dogs is permitted on 1,100 acres of the park, with the exception of: 1) hunting of woodchucks also known as groundhogs is prohibited and 2) dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day to March 31 in designated hunting areas. Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations are in effect for all activities in the park. Deer, turkey, grouse, squirrel, rabbit, and pheasant can be found in the park and on the adjacent State Game Land 289.

Location
The park is only two miles north of US Route 6, the major route through the northern tier. Secondary roads passing through the villages of East Troy and West Burlington travel over rolling farmland to the park.

Climate
Pennsylvania generally has a moist climate with cold winters and warm summers. The Mt. Pisgah State Park area has cold winter months with temperatures averaging around 22 to 24 degrees Fahrenheit (-6 to -4 degrees Celsius). The area's average summer temperatures range around 68 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit (20 to 22 Celsius).

Address
R.R. 3, Box 362
Troy, PA 16947-9448

Phone: 570-297-2734

Email: mtpisgah@dcnr.state.pa.us
  • Mt Pisgah State Park Travel Q&A

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