What to do in Lackawanna State Park

Lackawanna State Park was acquired and constructed with Projects "70 and 500" funds.
A focal point of the 1,411-acre park is the beautiful 198-acre Lackawanna Lake.
Lackawanna State Park has something to offer every outdoor recreation taste. It offers a shady campground, two organized group sites, a wonderful swimming beach at the lake, over 300 open sky picnic tables, both cold and warm water fishing and more than 5 miles of hiking trails – some of which are offered as equestrian and cross-country skiing trails. Ice skating is enjoyed in the winter along with ice fishing. Environmental education programming is available year-round at Lackawanna State Park. Over 500 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs. Common game species are ring-necked pheasant, ruffed grouse, turkey, rabbit and white-tailed deer.

Lackawanna State Park was acquired and constructed with Projects "70 and 500" funds. Project 70 funds acquired recreational lands and Project 500 funds constructed various facilities. Construction of the park day-use area began in 1968 and opened in 1972. Campground construction began in 1974 and opened during 1975.

A focal point of the 1,411-acre park is the beautiful 198-acre Lackawanna Lake.

Recreation
Lackawanna State Park has something to offer every outdoor recreation taste. It offers a shady campground, two organized group sites, a wonderful swimming beach at the lake, over 300 open sky picnic tables, both cold and warm water fishing and more than 5 miles of hiking trails – some of which are offered as equestrian and cross-country skiing trails. Ice skating is enjoyed in the winter along with ice fishing.

Environmental education programming is available year-round at Lackawanna State Park. The Bureau of State Parks seeks to advance environmental literacy, stewardship and civic responsibility through environmental education. The environmental education specialist provides formal and non-formal educational services to schools, communities and park visitors.

Over 500 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs, with the exception of: 1) hunting of woodchucks also known as groundhogs is prohibited and 2) dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day to March 31 in designated hunting areas. Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations are in effect for all activities in the park. The various types of terrain and both large fields and wooded areas are ideal game areas. Common game species are ring-necked pheasant, ruffed grouse, turkey, rabbit and white-tailed deer.

Location
The park is located in the Pocono Mountains and is easily accessible off Interstate 81. Visitors should take Exit 60 and travel 3 miles west on PA Route 524. Visitors coming via U.S. Routes 6 and 11 should take PA 438 east about 3 miles to PA 407, then south.

Climate
Pennsylvania generally has a moist climate with cold winters and warm summers. The Lackawanna State Park area has cold winter months with temperatures averaging around 22 to 24 degrees Fahrenheit (-6 to -4 degrees Celsius). The area's average summer temperatures range around 68 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit (20 to 22 Celsius).

Address
R.R. 1, Box 230
Dalton, PA 18414-9785

Phone: 570-945-3239

Email: lackawanna@dcnr.state.pa.us
  • Lackawanna State Park Travel Q&A

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