What to do in Knob Noster State Park

this information provided by www.mostateparks.com

Just south of Highway 50, about midway between Sedalia and Warrensburg, lies an often overlooked gem of the Missouri state park system. Knob Noster State Park is an ideal spot for relaxing and forgetting the cares of the world - even if just for a few hours. The park is an interesting mixture of prairie, savanna and forest, with 3,567 acres lying along both sides of a meandering creek. Several small lakes in the park cater to the fisherman, and non-motorized boats may be used. Picnic sites dot the lakeshore and three open picnic shelters make an ideal place for group get-togethers in a tranquil setting.The outdoor adventurer can enjoy several trails running through the park, including an equestrian and an all-terrain bicycle trail. Budding naturalists will enjoy hiking out to one of the savanna restoration areas and seeking out the many bird species found in the park. Pin Oak Slough Natural Area along Clearfork Creek has been recognized for its unique natural beauty.For visitors wanting to enjoy more than just a few hours here, there is a wooded campground with modern amenities. Two group camps offer outdoor facilities and fun for larger, organized groups.

Knob Noster State Park Campground Information

Knob Noster State Park offers basic and electric campsites and equestrian, group and special-use camping areas. Services available include reservable campsites, dump station, showers, water and laundry.

For reservations, there is a required two-night minimum stay for weekends and major holidays from May 15 through Sept. 15.

Park Gate Information

Park gates close at 10 p.m. year-round. Campers need to be sure to arrive prior to gate closure time.

Recreation
Fishing

There are two small lakes (Buteo and Clearfork) and a creek (Clearfork) that offer visitors the opportunity to fish. Catfish, bass, bluegill and crappie are some of the fish anglers may catch while fishing at Knob Noster State Park. Fishing is available sunrise to sunset daily, except during special management activities when the park may be closed.

Adult anglers must have a valid fishing license as described in the Wildlife Code of Missouri. (Depending on age, some anglers may not need a license to fish.)

Bank fishing is the most common way to fish here. There are no boat launches, however, small boats such as canoes can be carried from the parking lot to the water and hand launched. Electric trolling motors may be used.

Note: Due to some potential for health effects, it is recommended that pregnant women, children and those with lowered immune systems limit their consumption of catfish caught in Lake Buteo to less than one pound per week. This is recommended as a result of chemicals found in the lake some years ago.Trails

There are seven trails within Knob Noster State Park, ranging in distance from one-half mile to 7.1 miles. All trails are open for hiking. McAdoo Trail is the only trail open to equestrians and mountain bicyclists. Trails take visitors to different habitats in the park and offer a variety of animal and plant viewing opportunities. Trails are marked with different color arrows.

Discovery Trail (green arrows)

Visitors having just a few hours in the park may want to take the Discovery Trail. This three-fourths mile loop is rich in spring and summer wildflowers and offers a view of No Name Creek, where minnows, frogs, birds and deer are common sights. The Discovery Trail begins in the campground, winds around to the visitor center, then travels along the creek for a short distance before reaching the campground again.

North Loop Trail (yellow arrows)

This two-mile trail begins in the campground by the first showerhouse, and offers visitors a glimpse into the past. The forested trail opens up into a prairie management area before leading visitors through a rich, moist bottomland timberstand vivid with spring and summer wildflowers. On this trail, it is easy to imagine how the landscape appeared to settlers as they traveled through these once widespread plant communities. Possible wildlife sightings along this trail include the eastern bluebird, pileated woodpecker, turkey and deer. A connector trail marked with white arrows will shorten the length of the trail by approximately one-half mile.

Buteo Trail (white arrows)

Buteo Trail circles Buteo Lake and allows easy access to anglers wishing to try their luck at catching the "big one." Beaver, muskrat, frogs, snakes, several species of fish and even freshwater jellyfish inhabit Buteo Lake. The trail is slightly longer than a mile and has a very small section that travels on a park road due to beaver activity around the lake.

Hawk Nest Trail (red arrows)

Open woodlands dominated by oak and hickories enrich the experience of this one and three-fourths mile trail. Hawk Nest Trail shares sections of trail with both the Buteo and Clearfork Savanna trails. Due to the variety of habitats along the trail, many different kinds of plants and animals may be seen or heard. Wildflowers are abundant during spring and summer months.

Clearfork Savanna Trail (blue arrows)

This one-half mile loop allows access to a small interior section of a large open woodland management area known as Clearfork Savanna, providing a distinct contrast from the density of the Opossum Hollow Trail. Clearfork Savanna has been managed for more than 10 years, whereas the Opossum Hollow area has had limited management application.

Opossum Hollow Trail (green arrows)

This one and one-half mile trail is tucked away at the far end of Redbud Lane. Visitors located in the main campground will need to drive to access the trail head. Many areas of the park once contained open woodland, and the Opossum Hollow area is currently being managed and restored to provide an example of this habitat.

McAdoo Trail (yellow arrows)

This 7.1-mile trail is the park's only trail open to equestrians and mountain bicyclists, as well as hikers. The trail travels through both bottomland and upland forests with several creek crossings. Travelers on this trail will pass through Christopher Woods, a section of forest that contains the oldest stand of continuous timber within the park. Clearfork Creek may be crossed by using an old iron bridge. After heavy rains, this trail has many areas that hold water, so users will want to plan accordingly. This is a very rugged trail for mountain bicyclists and hikers, due to the standing water and hoof prints that can be present.

Location
873 SE 10thKnob Noster, MO 65336

Climate
Missouri experiences four distinct seasons with an average yearly temperature of 54 degrees F. Summer temperatures reach 90 degrees F often and are plagued with high humidity levels. Nighttime lows during the summer dip slightly near 70 degrees. September brings cooler fall weather with less humidity. By October nights begin to cool significantly and the fall foliage changes to brilliant hues of orange, red and yellow. Winter months bring an average of 24 inches of snow and normal temperatures average between 20 and 45 degrees F. Spring is characterized by wet weather with temperatures reaching between 32 and 60 degrees F.

Address
873 SE 10th
Knob Noster, MO 65336

Phone: 660-563-2463

Email: moparks@dnr.mo.gov
  • Knob Noster State Park Travel Q&A

advertisement

advertisement