What to do in Hickory Run State Park

The park is part of an area acquired in a treaty with American Indians. From 1790 to 1835 the Commonwealth sold warrants, for approximately 400 acres, to persons willing to pay for registration and survey work. Robert Morris, hailed as the "financier of the American Revolution," and signer of both the Declaration of Independence and Constitution purchased warrants in the Hickory Run area.

The National Park Service with the help of the Works Progress Administration built the Hickory Run Recreation Demonstration Area during the 1930's. In 1945, this outstanding recreation area was given to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and became Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field is a true relic of the past. This area is a National Natural Landmark and State Park Natural Area. Some of the boulders measure as much as 26 feet long.

Hickory Run State Park offers an exciting variety of recreational opportunities during every season of the year including family camping, group camping, picnicking and an elaborate 40 mile trail network. Winter sports include snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, ice skating and sledding. A very large portion of the park is open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established Pennsylvania Game Commission seasons.

Diverse habitats and forest types, extensive wild areas and unique geological formations makes Hickory Run an excellent outdoor classroom. From March to November, the seasonal park environmental education specialist conducts various hand-on activities, guided walks and presentations on the natural and historical resources for school groups, scouts, civic organizations and the general public.

The park is part of an area acquired in a treaty with American Indians. From 1790 to 1835 the Commonwealth sold warrants, for approximately 400 acres, to persons willing to pay for registration and survey work.

Robert Morris, hailed as the "financier of the American Revolution," and signer of both the Declaration of Independence and Constitution purchased warrants in the Hickory Run area.

By 1880, the region had been completely cut over. Hemlocks were cut and peeled of the bark, which was used for tanning. White pines were sawed at local mills operated by water power. The remains of several mills are still visible along Hickory Run and Sand Spring Run. On nearly every stream in this vicinity, dams were built to supply the power. Several of these dams exist today.

Colonel Harry C. Trexler, an Allentown businessman, purchased several tracts of land in the area of what is now the park. After his death, trustees of his estate sold 12,908 acres to the National Park Service.

The Hickory Run Recreation Demonstration Area was built by the National Park Service with the help of the Works Progress Administration during the 1930's. In 1945, this outstanding recreation area was given to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and became Hickory Run State Park.

The Boulder Field is a true relic of the past. This area is a National Natural Landmark and State Park Natural Area. It has remained relatively unchanged for more than 20,000 years. The Boulder Field appears striking because of its flatness and absence of vegetation over the large area of 400 feet by 1,800 feet. Some of the boulders measure as much as 26 feet long.

Recreation
Hickory Run State Park offers an exciting variety of recreational opportunities during every season of the year including: family camping, group camping, picnicking and an elaborate 40 mile trail network. Winter sports include: snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, ice skating and sledding.

A very large portion of the park is open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established Pennsylvania Game Commission seasons, with the exception of: 1) hunting of woodchucks also known as groundhogs is prohibited and 2) dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day to March 31 in designated hunting areas. Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations are in effect for all activities in the park. White-tailed deer, turkey, black bear and gray squirrels are common game species. In addition, the snowshoe hare is quite common in the park. State Game Lands number 40, 129 and 141, which adjoin the park provide additional areas open to hunting. The park is used by fishermen, campers, hikers, and picnickers and EXTREME CAUTION with firearms must be exercised at all times.

Diverse habitats and forest types, extensive wild areas and unique geological formations makes Hickory Run an excellent outdoor classroom. From March to November, the seasonal park environmental education specialist conducts various hand-on activities, guided walks and presentations on the natural and historical resources for school groups, scouts, civic organizations and the general public.

Location
The park is easily reached from several locations. From Interstate 80 take Exit 41 at the Hickory Run State Park Exit and drive east on PA 534 for 6 miles. From the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, take Exit 35 and drive west on PA Route 940 for 3 miles then turn east on PA Route 534 for 6 miles. The park is within a two or three hour drive from Harrisburg, Philadelphia and New York City and one hour from Allentown, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.

Climate
Pennsylvania generally has a moist climate with cold winters and warm summers. The Hickory Run State Park area has cold winter months with temperatures averaging around 24 to 28 degrees Fahrenheit (-4 to -2 degrees Celsius). The area's average summer temperatures range around 72 to 74 degrees Fahrenheit (22 to 23 Celsius).

Address
R.R. 1, Box 81
White Haven, PA 18661-9712

Phone: 570-443-0400

Email: hickoryrun@dcnr.state.pa.us
  • Hickory Run State Park Travel Q&A

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