Expert Travel Advice to Yellowstone National Park

Top Answers To Yellowstone National Park Travel Questions

  • Frankie answered:
    Alot depends on your time constraints. There is so much to see not only in YellowStone but the surrounding areas. If possible, to the West is West YellowStone. The drive to Bozeman from West is spectacular through the gorge. From Bozeman head east to Livingston then south to Gardner. The drive through "Paradise Valley" with the collection of highest peaks in Montana to east is precious. Enter the park at Gardner, visit the Mammoth Hot Springs, head east through Lamar Valley( a must), and stay in Cooke City. (3 people were attacked in tents by a mother grizz with 3 cubs last year, I was there the day it happened, very sad event). If time allows, take the "Bear Tooth Highway". A drive you will never forget. Mountain peaks are near 12,000 feet, so if a person has breathing problems, don't go. Head back south through the park to the Teton's. If possible go to Jackson Hole. The drive there is easy (may seem kind of long if your in a hurry) and memorible. Jackson Hole can be expensive but if your not staying a long time,it is worth it. Take the "Jackson Pass" (I think it is call) over into Idaho (I forget the name of the little town on the Idaho side, but there is a great Hot Dawg resturant there). Key in WestYellowstone on your GPS and the backroads are a treat. Matter of fact there is a Canyon that is in the middle of the flat lands that is pretty cool. I have ran on way too much, but my lovely wife and I had the opportunity to spend April through October North of WestYellowstone and it was a dream come true. Hope this helps. Oh BTW, the summer in the park has a LOT of traffic. Be prepaired to go slow. Drinks and snacks are recommended.
  • Anonymous user answered:
    Not to do Old Faithful and the historic inn there a disservice, but I'd personally head up to the Tower falls region, yes, and get your boots on to hike 10,243-foot Mt. Washburn. The Chittenden Road trailhead offers a steadier climb, while the Dunraven Pass approach is a bit steeper with some fun switchbacks. Either way, look for killer views of the park, the distant Tetons, and the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River. I think this option also offers a more logical route past Lake Yellowstone and up toward the Mammoth Springs area at the NW corner of the park. Sounds like a fun trip. If you're still looking for a place to stay, don't forget the historic lodging at Lake Yellowstone Hotel! http://bit.ly/ihs0pc
  • Anonymous user answered:
    Here's some advice we gathered for your trip: Grand Teton National Park: Jenny Lake is a great area of the park to spend the day. Take a boat ride across the scenic lake, with the Tetons in the background, and day hike on a plethora of trials around the lake. Also, don't miss the new tram at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. It's open in the summer and delivers hikers to the Teton Crest Trail at 10,450 feet in no time! I would take another day to hang around Jackson, or take in some world-class fishing nearby (though May is probably too early for fishing). Yellowstone: You should spend at least three days in Yellowstone, as it is an enormous park with so much to offer (the same could be said for the Tetons). Don't miss Old Faithful, where you should stop for a bit and view one of its famous eruptions. With over 1,100 miles of trails, you have quite the variety of hikes available. Try one of the day hikes near Old Faithful and one near Mammoth Springs, each in different parts of Yellowstone, so that you can catch some of the famous sites during your hike. Find out more specific information about hiking in Yellowstone on the National Park Service website (http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/hiking.htm).
  • bonnie answered:
    the grand tetons! spectacular view as you enter the valley from the south.take a class on jackson lake that will teach how the valley was formed. backpack to lake solutude. only one other camping when i was there. have wonderful brunch at jenny lake lodge. all a vivid memory.

advertisement

advertisement